from £75 / night help Price for guests, Nights

The Bakehouse, Self Catering – Home 5372953 Cottage

  • 2 bedrooms
  • 6 sleeps
  • 2 nights min stay

The Bakehouse, Self Catering – Home 5372953

Excellent Excellent – based on 3 reviews

  • Cottage
  • 2 bedrooms
  • 6 sleeps
  • 2 nights min stay

Cottage / 2 bedrooms / 1 bathroom / sleeps 6

Key Info

  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Not suitable for children
  • No pets allowed

Description from owner

Description

The Bakehouse is a lovingly converted detached cottage set in its own enclosed garden off a very quiet side road. Once part of a group of buildings associated with a merchants house, it nestles unassumingly into the hillside. The sea is a three minute walk away, the welcoming pub about a mile. The house is for all seasons, spacious yet cozy with a wood burner. Set out on adventures or curl up in the window seat with a book, this is a peaceful space to be in. A place to experience being an islander.

On a practical note, the house is very generously appointed with plenty of cutlery and pots and pans in the kitchen which has a dining table to seat 6. And the living room has three large sofas and a flat screen tv. A sun porch provides additional seating for 4 and a coffee table (a good place for kids painting activities). The bathroom has a separate shower, as well as bath with mixer hose. All rooms are on one level, and there is a discrete drop down handle next to the toilet,

The Bakehouse is a lovingly converted detached cottage set in its own enclosed garden off a very quiet side road. Once part of a group of buildings associated with a merchants house, it nestles unassumingly into the hillside. The sea is a three minute walk away, the welcoming pub about a mile. The house is for all seasons, spacious yet cozy with a wood burner. Set out on adventures or curl up in the window seat with a book, this is a peaceful space to be in. A place to experience being an islander.

On a practical note, the house is very generously appointed with plenty of cutlery and pots and pans in the kitchen which has a dining table to seat 6. And the living room has three large sofas and a flat screen tv. A sun porch provides additional seating for 4 and a coffee table (a good place for kids painting activities). The bathroom has a separate shower, as well as bath with mixer hose. All rooms are on one level, and there is a discrete drop down handle next to the toilet, which helps those with mobility problems. Tables, chairs and a barbecue for the garden are provided, and there is a shed for any bicycles and other outdoor equipment you may bring.

Join in with island life, enter your jar of wild flowers in the annual produce show, you will be made welcome.The house is detached and garden enclosed, so making life a little easier on parents with small children who will love the freedom of the long summer days. Blustery winter days have their own romantic charm - holding a warm hand on a walk under vast skies beside cold seas - what could be better? The starry nights, and occasional Northern Lights of autumn and winter are stunning, and best viewed on the short walk back from the pub, with a little inner warmth already in place!

Location description from owner

The Scotland region

The Orkney Islands, just North of Scotland are justly famous for their Stone Age archaeology sites, some of which have been inscribed by UNESCO on the World Heritage list. Recently the work of archaeologists have brought aspects of this era to life in ongoing excavations at the Ness of Brodgar that featured in the National Geographic. But this is the tip of the iceberg: Everywhere in Orkney the upstanding ruins of the past - including Iron Age brochs, Viking houses and castles, remain in and around fields and farms and on the shores. Kirkwall, a town founded by Vikings, has Scotland's most northerly Cathedral, that is dedicated to St Magnus, a martyred Earl of the 12th century, who was the centre of a sea-borne cult, extending as far as the Faroes. Orkney is as much Scandinavian in its roots as it is Scottish, being part of the Norwegian/Danish kingdom until 1468. The local dialect is full of words coming from Norse and Scottish roots and spoken with a Scandinavian lilt.

Nowadays Orkney relies on farming, fishing, renewable industries, arts, crafts and tourism. This means there is always plenty to do, see, and eat, and with excellent opportunities for shopping unique items. 5,000 years of cattle raising in these islands has created the ideal circumstance for producing the best beef in Europe. Foodies will also enjoy - fresh lobster, available all year round, crab, and scallops, artisan cheeses as well as the very good mass produced Orkney cheese. North Ronaldsay lamb is an ancient breed of sheep, fed mainly on seaweed, and not to be missed.

The wildlife in Orkney is not solely confined to birds, which are everywhere, and supported on many RSPB reserves, but marine mammals can be found everywhere, seal watching by people is matched only by people watching by seals, who are mightily curious. There is no rush to life in Orkney. Only catch your transport here, drop your shoulders and relax.

At 59 degrees North you might expect a sub-Arctic climate, but the gulf stream warms us up, and snow is only an occasional, and delightful visitor. Windy skies and seas are a feature here. Occasionally it blows a "real hooly" and perhaps the best plan is to snuggle up indoors for a few hours. The weather is very changeable, just wear layers to enjoy being out and about in sun and in rain.

Rousay

Rousay is a little gem of an island, could well be Orkney's friendliest, and only 20 minutes from Tingwall by ro-ro ferry. The Bakehouse is on the south facing side of the island and is tucked into a nook in the hill. The hills of Rousay are heather covered, with a fringe of green arable fields below leading down to the shore. Bakehouse is on the border between the two, in a little group of houses that was the old merchant centre for the island. A short walk up the track brings you into the hill, or down, to the shore. The Taversoe hotel and pub is less than a mile away along the road. The dark nights make for great star gazing on the way home.

Rousay's population is about 200, yet we have plenty of facilities - a gym, a community school (for our primary pupils), a shop and two pubs and a resident doctor. There are local events that visitors are welcome to join in with - everything from the half Marathon - The Rousay Lap - at the end of August, or on a smaller scale - various crafting events at the Craft Hub. Archaeologists frequently work here, and events are arranged for visitors to join. Visiting children have a section in the annual produce show for entries such as a bunch of wild flowers.

The amazing number of well preserved archaeology sites in Rousay have led to it being dubbed "Egypt of the North". The largest chambered tomb (about 5,500 years old) at Midhowe is quite breathtaking. The Taversoe Tuick is two storey Neolithic burial cairn its lower deck being illuminated by a winter solstice sun. These are just two of many sites including a Standing Stone goes for a drink from a nearby loch at New Year! Hopefully you will never see that, however, since it brings very bad luck. The Orkneyinga Saga is an Icelandic saga written about events in Orkney: it tells the stories of the Earls and a lot of daring-do. Rousay was the home of some of those featured. The nearby island of Wyre, has the oldest stone castle in Scotland, built for Kolbein Hruga, and later besieged. St Magnus was martyred in Egilsay. A magnificent church with a high towerwas built on the summit of that islandto commemorate the event, and to lead boats into Kirkwall from afar. A stroll into the hill brings you to The Muckle Water a large loch.

Theres a lot to do. Make sure to give yourself time.. there is plenty of time here.

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Bed & bathroom

  • Bedroom 1: Double Bed
    Bedroom 2: 2 Single Beds
    Beds in other rooms: 2 Single Beds
  • 1 Family bathroom

Access

  • Not suitable for wheelchair users

Policies

Payment
This rental can only be paid for online through Holiday Lettings using your credit/debit card or PayPal (never by bank or wire transfer).
Smoking
No smoking at this property
Cancellation policy
View Policy

About the owner

Julie G
Response rate:
61%
Calendar updated::
09 Jan 2017
Overall rating:

Languages spoken: English


This Cottage has 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom and sleeps 6. It’s been listed on Holiday Lettings since 20 Sep 2015. Located in Orkney Islands, it has 3 reviews with an overall rating of 5. The average weekly rate is £270.

The Owner has a response rate of 61% and the property’s calendar was last updated on 09 Jan 2017.

Map

Map and how to get there

Map

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