from £160 / night help Price for guests, Nights

KYRENIA – Home 287645 House

  • 3 bedrooms
  • 8 sleeps
  • 7 nights min stay

House / 3 bedrooms / 3 bathrooms / sleeps 8

Key Info

  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Nearest beach 4 km
  • Child friendly
  • Car advised
  • Air conditioning
  • Ask about pets
  • Private garden

Description from owner

Description

Kryenia is located in Port du Roy development, 1 mile away from Aigues Mortes.
Kryenia is a fantastic family home, sleeping up to 8 people all the expected conveniences such as a super modern kitchen, large lounge rooms, superb balconies and a veranda with its own mooring.
The large modern, well equipped kitchen includes an induction hob, larder style fridge/freezer, washing machine and dishwasher and coffee machine.
The light and spacious lounge room which has just been recently refurbished with cream leather sofas, occasional tables, a dining table that can seat up to eight people. Large TV with freeview channels and a DVD player. New modern fire place. The lounge has large French patio doors leading to a two tiered veranda looking on to the water way. Equipped with a new gas bbq, large dining table, sun umbrella, sun loungers and chairs. The sun beats down from mid morning till early evening perfect for soaking up the sun. The veranda has its owning mooring which is through

Kryenia is located in Port du Roy development, 1 mile away from Aigues Mortes.
Kryenia is a fantastic family home, sleeping up to 8 people all the expected conveniences such as a super modern kitchen, large lounge rooms, superb balconies and a veranda with its own mooring.
The large modern, well equipped kitchen includes an induction hob, larder style fridge/freezer, washing machine and dishwasher and coffee machine.
The light and spacious lounge room which has just been recently refurbished with cream leather sofas, occasional tables, a dining table that can seat up to eight people. Large TV with freeview channels and a DVD player. New modern fire place. The lounge has large French patio doors leading to a two tiered veranda looking on to the water way. Equipped with a new gas bbq, large dining table, sun umbrella, sun loungers and chairs. The sun beats down from mid morning till early evening perfect for soaking up the sun. The veranda has its owning mooring which is through a locked gate and railings, the gate is very secure perfect for any little ones playing outside.
Stairs in the lounge lead straight upstairs to the bathroom, toilet and three double bedrooms each with balconies.
The main bedroom has a double bed with ensuite shower and basin. The balcony looks over the area and neighbouring houses. The second and third bedrooms have a double bed with French patio doors leading to a shared balcony which looks out to the mooring and waterway. Both balconies are quintessentially French which iron railings and lovely wooden shutters.
Each bedroom has comfy double beds, with two bedside tables and lamps, full length and shorter mirrors and large sliding door wardrobes with lots of space including hanging, drawers, and shelves and hanging shoe racks.
The main bathroom is upstairs with a bath/shower combination, twin sinks and ample storage space in draws underneath. The toilet is next door. The second toilet is situated downstairs next to the kitchen and front door.
Car parking is available to the front and right of the house. There are four adult bikes and two child seats available in the garage for you to use. Two of the bikes have shopping baskets which are very handy when popping out for croissants.

Summary of house/ Amenities:

• 3 double bedrooms, with balcony. One with ensuite
• Veranda over looking water
• WIFI
• Large, modern, well equipped kitchen
• Large, light and airy lounge room
• Large flatscreen tv, with sky channels and dvd player
• Log fire screen
• Dining table for eight
• One downstairs toilet
• Main bathroom and toilet upstairs
• Large wardrobe in each room
• Air conditioning
• Bikes available
• Free Car parking available
• Hair dryer
• Gated access to mooring
• Gated access to street
• 2 extra beds are available, recommended for children only

Location description from owner

The Occitanie region

The area known as "Languedoc" covered a large part of southern France; Roussillon is a much smaller area, being more or less the area covered by the Eastern Pyrenees department. Roussillon, in the past, was the northern part of Catalonia., and people here still speak Catalan as well as French.

The regional capital of Languedoc-Roussillon is the city of Montpellier, a thriving modern city in the Hérault, with a historic centre; other major cities in the region are Nimes, Narbonne, Sete and Perpignan.
Unlike Provence, Languedoc has a considerable coastal plain, and except in the department of Eastern Pyrenees, much of the coastal area is flat. In the past, the land was swampy and plagued with mosquitoes, which is why tourism did not develop here in the 19th century, as it did on the coast further east. However, the swamps were drained long ago, and the mosquitoes brought under control, leading to the tourist development of this long coastline as from the nineteen-sixties.
Today, the coast of Languedoc is characterised by long sandy beaches, often with plenty of space, and a modern tourist infrastructure, with twentieth-century resorts such as Cap d'Agde, Palavas, or Narbonne Plage. The brash developments of the sixties have had time to mature, parts of the coastline have been recovered for more environmentally sensitive tourism development; and among the quite densely built-up resort areas, there are attractive bits of coastline and hinterland. However, as a general rule, the areas within 20 km of the coast have been extensively developed for tourism in the last forty years.
The fertile coastal plain is given over to agriculture, vineyards and - particularly in Roussillon - fruit and vegetables. Languedoc is one of France's major wine-growing areas.
Those who do not want to spend their holidays being char-grilled on a beach will perhaps prefer to discover the old Languedoc, away from the cities and the immediate coastal strip. Inland Languedoc is a beautiful area, characterised by vineyards and "garrigue", arid rocky Mediteranean hills with their vegetation of scrub, aromatic bushes and occasional fields. Further inland, the valleys of the Cevennes, more wooded and rural, give way to the Cevennes hills, the southeastern peaks of the Massif Central.
The area has a lot of historic cities, such as Nimes (1 hour) with its superb Roman remains and nearby the Roman viaduct that fed the city's fountains in Roman times, the famous walled city of Carcassonne (2 hours), the former Roman provincial capital of Narbonne, and other smaller ancient cities, such as Agde and not forgetting Avignon with it's famous bridge and, at one time the centre of the Catholic Church with the Vatican's equivalent well worth a visit.
The Pyrenees, forming a natural land barrier between France and Spain, are a beautiful range of high mountains, wooded on their lower slopes, but offering good mountain and hill walking higher up - not to mention the attraction of day trips into Spain. The coastline where they meet the sea is unlike the rest of the Languedoc coast, and is characterised by old coastal villages such as Banyuls and Collioure, rocky cliffs and small coves. The villages on the Pyrenean coastline can be reached directly by train.

Access to Languedoc : by TGV from Paris Gare de Lyon, or from Lille; train from many cities, motorway from Paris, Lille, Strasbourg, Nancy, Lyon, Geneva. There are airports at Nimes, Montpellier, Carcassonne and Perpignan, with low-cost flights from the UK, Belgium and Holland..

The Origin of the name "Languedoc":
The "Langue d'oc" was the version of French spoken in the south of the country, and Languedoc referred to the part of France in which the "language of Oc" was spoken. "Oc" was the word for "yes" in this part of France, at a time when people in the north of France said "oeuil", an old French word that has become modern French "oui". Today, the "langue d'oc" survives in the many patois still spoken by a few people in rural areas of this part of Fr
With so much sunshine and such varied terrain, Languedoc is a mecca for those looking to get out there and DO something. The list of activities and things to do in Languedoc Roussillon, south France, is absolutely endless.
You'll find water practically everywhere in Languedoc Roussillon, so there's no shortage of canal boating, canoeing, sailing, windsurfing, fishing and swimming (click here to visit our Beaches section).
Three mountain ranges make skiing, rock climbing and walking great options too. Golf and tennis are also well-catered for, with golf courses and tennis centres dotted across the region.
For the slightly more adventurous, there's ballooning (there's nothing like floating over the rivers and vineyards of Languedoc on a summer's day), paragliding and flying (guided flights over the Cathar castles are highly recommended).
For equestrians, there's France's most famous horse trail (Le Sentier Cathar), and for ornithologists, the variety of birds in Languedoc, especially in the mountainous and swamp regions, with everything from vultures to pelicans.

Port Du Roy

Alexandre Dumas's tribute to Aigues-Mortes still rings true, though the town's name in English, "Dead Waters," is less poetic. Located in the heart of the marshy Camargue region on France's Mediterranean coast, Aigues-Mortes is a completely walled town that has changed little in appearance since its glory in the Middle AgesThe town was founded by Louis IX in 1241. Before that date, all of the ports on the south coast of present-day France were owned by the king of Aragon, the Germanic emperor, and the Pope. With no access to the sea, the French did not share in the lucrative Mediterranean trade, nor were they guaranteed free departure for the crusades. This situation changed when Louis obtained the flatland of ponds and marshes from an order of monks, whose Psalmody Abbey on the site dated from the fifth century.
Recent archaeological excavations of the ruined abbey have uncovered even earlier ruins dating to the Gallo-Roman era.
Aigues-Mortes was an immediate success. Settlers were attracted by Louis's offer of exemption from most taxes. With the construction of his opening to the sea now underway, Saint Louis departed in 1248 for a crusade to Egypt. This seventh crusade was largely organized by Louis, and its members were mostly French.
The new port quickly became important in maritime trade and a source of revenue for its proprietor. Louis began construction of the town walls in 1266, but he was not to see them finished. He died in 1270 on his second crusade en route to Tunis. The walls were not completed until almost the end of the century. By that time, the population of the town had risen to 15,000, three times today's population. At that point, Aigues-Mortes's fortunes were at their peak, and began to decline. The town's eclipse began with the rise of Marseille. It was completed as the basin, which fronted on the sea, was gradually filled by silt deposited by the Rhône River. It never recovered.
Modern visitors to Aigues-Mortes, now about five miles from the sea, will rejoice at what was calamity for the fourteenth century inhabitants. As rival ports rose, and access to the sea was blocked, trade decreased, and townsmen moved away. The town stagnated, but it did not die. It was maintained as a fortified city, potentially important for coastal defense. Since there was nothing in the following centuries to attract new inhabitants, the town did not grow, and the walls were not torn down. Today, visitors wander about in a virtually-intact thirteenth century fortified town.
The walls are particularly interesting. The land side was protected by a sea-water moat, now unfortunately filled. Three corners of the rectangular wall are protected by towers of different design and size that are almost separated from the wall to give defenders a clear shot at attackers. The Constance Tower, constructed 1242-1248, is unique. Located at the northwest corner of the town, it was completely separated from the wall. Saint Louis initially intended that the tower be the sole defense of Aigues-Mortes. With walls sixteen feet thick, the structure, in its design more keep than tower, contained rooms used by the king during his visits to Aigues-Mortes. The weight of the massive tower was so great that the foundation was laid on a platform of huge oak pillars driven through the marshy soil to the harder earth beneath.
The tower was originally surrounded by a moat, part of which can still be seen. Its height, 105 feet, was sufficient for lookouts to spot ships on the sea that were trying to evade the payment of taxes. The panoramic view from the top--after climbing fifty-three steps--is still rewarding. With the decline of Aigues-Mortes, the tower served as a prison for five hundred years, most notably to house Protestant Huguenots during the persecutions of the eighteenth century.
The center of the town, a sunny little square, predictably named Place St. Louis and graced by his statue, is a pleasant place for lunch. The restaurants that line one side of the square feature outside tables shaded by trees and umbrellas. After lunch, visit Our Lady of the Sands church, just opposite, one of the first buildings constructed in the town. Indeed, it may have predated the town. The main altar is a table from the Psalmody Abbey. The L'Hotel de Ville, also on the square, is a fine example of a typical town hall of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Two seventeenth-century churches, within three blocks of the square, are worth visiting. The Chapel of the Grey Penitents has a striking altarpiece. A number of large eighteenth-century paintings decorate the Chapel of the White Penitents. Government Hall, near the Constance Tower, dates from the sixteenth century. On the roof of the hall is a turret which defends the bridge that runs from the wall across the moat to Constance Tower.
The only local industry of note, the extraction of salt from sea water, has been practiced here for over two thousand years. Phoenicians and Romans labored at the same task on the same site.
The inhabitants of Aigues-Mortes have found novel uses for the salt. In the fifteenth century, the town was attacked and occupied by a force of Burgundians. When the town was retaken, the Burgundians were all killed. Faced with disposing of the mountain of corpses, and fearing disease, the bodies were piled into the tower and covered with salt. The tower has since been called the Burgundians Tower.
During the peak of the summer season, the main streets can be busy, though not oppressively so. A stroll down side streets can be most rewarding, especially if you have stayed overnight and are up before the arrival of the day trippers.
For information on Aigues-Mortes, the Camargue, and Provence in general, contact the French Government Tourist Office, 610 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10020, telephone 212/757-1125. For more specific information, including hotels, restaurants and events, write to: Office Municipal du Tourisme, Cloître des Capucins, Place Saint-Louis, B.P. 32, 30220 Aigues-Mortes, France. Telephone 66-53-73-00.

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Families

  • Great for children of all ages
  • Some pets are welcome - please contact the owner
  • High chair available

Bed & bathroom

  • 3 Double Beds, 2 Single Beds
  • 1 Family bathroom, 1 En suite, 1 Toilet Only

Amenities

  • Air conditioning
  • Private garden
  • BBQ
  • Balcony or terrace
  • Sea view
  • Boat available
  • Bicycles available
  • Central heating
  • Cooker
  • Fridge
  • Freezer
  • Microwave
  • Toaster
  • Kettle
  • Dishwasher
  • Washing machine
  • Iron
  • High chair available
  • TV
  • Video player
  • DVD player
  • CD player
  • Telephone
  • Hair dryer
  • Linen provided
  • Towels provided

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Access

  • Parking
  • Secure parking
  • Not suitable for wheelchair users

Policies

Payment
This rental can only be paid for online through Holiday Lettings using your credit/debit card or PayPal (never by bank or wire transfer).
Smoking
No smoking at this property
Cancellation policy
View Policy

About the owner

Howard P
Response rate:
30%
Calendar updated::
01 Jul 2016
Overall rating:

Languages spoken: English, French


This House has 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and sleeps 8. It’s been listed on Holiday Lettings since 25 Apr 2013. Located in Aigues-Mortes, it has 2 reviews with an overall rating of 5. The average weekly rate is £1120.

The Owner has a response rate of 30% and the property’s calendar was last updated on 01 Jul 2016.

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“We left wanting more”

Reviewed 24 Aug 2013

Had a fantastic week at Kyrenia. Had never stayed on a marina before and loved it. The villa itself is spacious and well equipped, and in a very good marina location. We hired the owner's boat for a few days and really benefited from the access to canals and the Med. The weather was nice and hot throughout with a welcome breeze most of the time. Only niggle was an unfriendly local key handover process, but we didn't let that detract. Though warned about mosquitos, we did not find this any worse (in fact somewhat better) than many other Med holidays we have had in Summer. Aigues Mortes at 10 mins on foot is a local gem with more than enough variety of cafes and restaurants. You would enjoy this holiday even if you do not actually get on the water, for it's peaceful location with local access to a fascinating town. We'd come again - a week wasn't enough.

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