from £85 / night help Price for guests, Nights

Masseria Spina Resort – Home 243256 Villa

  • 10 bedrooms
  • 32 sleeps
  •  min stay varies

Masseria Spina Resort – Home 243256

  • Villa
  • 10 bedrooms
  • sleeps 32
  •  min stay varies

Excellent Excellent – based on 3 reviews

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Villa / 10 bedrooms / sleeps 32

Key Info

  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Nearest beach 1 km
  • Swimming pool
  • Child friendly
  • Car advised
  • Air conditioning
  • Pet friendly
  • Private garden

Description from owner

Description

Lovely farm of XVI century and just steps from the sea.

At your disposal 5 apartments including:

One located in the heart of the farm, with 2 beds and a double sofa bed,

bathroom and kitchen;

the second located at the entrance of the farm, surrounded by olive

groves is divided on 2 floors with 3 beds and a double sofa bed, 2 baths and kitchen;

The third apartment is also divided on two floors with 6 beds and a double sofa bed, 2 bathroom and kitchen.

The fourth is in the main building of the farm on the second floor have 3 double bedrooms and a double sofa bed, a large living room, a dining room, kitchen and bathroom.

Location description from owner

The Puglia region

Apuliais a region in Southern Italy bordering the Adriatic Sea in the east, the Ionian Sea to the southeast, and the Strait of Òtranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south. Its most southern

Lovely farm of XVI century and just steps from the sea.

At your disposal 5 apartments including:

One located in the heart of the farm, with 2 beds and a double sofa bed,

bathroom and kitchen;

the second located at the entrance of the farm, surrounded by olive

groves is divided on 2 floors with 3 beds and a double sofa bed, 2 baths and kitchen;

The third apartment is also divided on two floors with 6 beds and a double sofa bed, 2 bathroom and kitchen.

The fourth is in the main building of the farm on the second floor have 3 double bedrooms and a double sofa bed, a large living room, a dining room, kitchen and bathroom.

Location description from owner

The Puglia region

Apuliais a region in Southern Italy bordering the Adriatic Sea in the east, the Ionian Sea to the southeast, and the Strait of Òtranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south. Its most southern portion, known as Salento peninsula, forms a high heel on the "boot" of Italy.

History
Apulia is one of the richest archaeological regions in Italy. It was first settled by Illyric peoples, the best-known of whom were the Messapii. Mycenaean Greeks[4] then colonized the area. In the 8th century BC, the Ancient Greeks expanded until reaching the area of Taranto and Salento in Magna Graecia. In the 5th and 4th centuries BC, the Greek settlement at Taras produced a distinctive style of pottery (Apulian vase painting).

In ancient times only the northern part of the region was called Apulia; the southern peninsula was known as Calabria, a name now used to designate the southwestern tip of the Italian peninsula (the "toe" of the Italian "boot").

Apulia was an important area for the ancient Romans, who conquered it during the course of wars against the Samnites and against Pyrrhus in the 4th and 3rd centuries BC but also suffered a crushing defeat here in the battle of Cannae against Hannibal. However, after the Carthaginians left the region, the Romans captured the ports of Brindisi and Taranto, and established dominion over the region. During the Imperial age Apulia was a flourishing area for production of grain and oil, becoming the most important exporter to the Eastern provinces.

After the fall of Rome, Apulia was held successively by the Goths, the Lombards and, from the 6th century onwards, the Byzantines. Bari became the capital of a province that extended to modern Basilicata, and was ruled by a catepano (governor), hence the name of Capitanata of the Barese neighbourhood. From 800 on, a Saracen presence was intermittent, but Apulia remained under the Byzantine authority, until the 11th century, when the Normans conquered it with relative ease.

Robert Guiscard set up the Duchy of Apulia in 1059. After the Norman conquest of Sicily in the late 11th century, Palermo replaced Melfi (just west of present day Apulia) as the center of Norman power, and Apulia became a mere province, first of the Kingdom of Sicily, then of the Kingdom of Naples. From the late 12th to early 13th centuries, Apulia was a favorite residence of the Hohenstaufen emperors, notably Frederick II. After the fall of the latter's heir, Manfred, under the Angevine and Crown of Aragon/Spanish dominations Apulia became largely dominated by a small number of powerful landowners (Baroni). In 1734 there were the battle of Bitonto, a Spanish victory over Austrian forces. The coast was occupied at times by the Turks and by the Venetians. The French also controlled the region in 1806–15, resulting in the abolition of feudalism and the reformation of the justice system.

Liberation movements began to spread in the 1820s. In 1861, with the fall of Two Sicilies, the region joined Italy. Social and agrarian reforms that had proceeded slowly from the 19th century accelerated in the mid-20th century.

The characteristic Apulian architecture of the 11th–13th centuries reflects Greek, Byzantine, Norman, and Pisan influences. Universities are located in Bari, Lecce and Foggia, with branches in Taranto and Brindisi.

Monopoli

Monopoli (Monòpolis in Greek) is a town and comune in Italy, in the province of Bari, region of Apulia. The town is roughly 156 square km in area and lies about 40 km southeast from Bari. It has about 50,000 inhabitants.
The city is important mostly as an agricultural, industrial and touristic centre.

History
The area was first settled in 500 a.C. as a fortified Messapic city.

In order to improve communication with the Orient, between the years 108 and 110 A.C. , the Emperor Traiano ordered the construction of a Via Publica which was named after him. Monopoli is the city in Puglia that has the longest stretch of the Via Traiana. This is one of the most important Roman roads of the Empire. In 2012 the City of Monopoli created an archeological park around the remains of this ancient road. The difference between this new road and the Appian Way was the shorter distance between Benevento and Brindisi. The Appian Way started in Rome, reaching Benevento and continued on to Taranto, and from here the road continued to Brindisi from which port people could embark toward Greece, the Orient and the Balkans. The Traiana Way which followed an older route, originated in Benevento and crossing the flat tableland up to Canosa continued on to Ruvo where a fork in the road led in two different directions. The internal road went to Modugno, Ceglie del Campo, Capurso, Rutigliano and Conversano, while the coastal road went to Bari, Polignano and Monopoli. These two roads joined again at Egnazia from where the road continued to Brindisi. This road which Emperor Traiano had constructed became the route of choice to reach Brindisi because it was shorter than the Appian Way. It was travelled by military troops, merchants, slaves, pilgrims and, after the fall of Rome, even by hordes of barbarians. There is another important road on the other side of the Adriatic Sea which seems to be the continuation of this road. It is called the Egnazia Way and starts in Dyrrachium (Durazzo), crossing a mountainous area to reach Thessaloniki (Salonica) and continues on to Constantinople (Istanbul).

After the destruction of Gnathia by the Ostrogoth king Totila in 545, its inhabitants fled to Monopoli, from which it derives its name as "only city". In the following centuries the area would be controlled by the Byzantines, Normans and Hohenstaufen, and was a starting point for naval Crusades expeditions, living in that period the peak of its splendour. Later it was a fief under Angevine and Aragonese feudal lords.

In 1484 the city came under Venetian control and saw an economic upswing as a seaport on the Adriatic Sea as a base between Bari and Brindisi, as well as through trading its own agricultural goods. It was frequently attacked by Muslim pirates in the following decades. These continuous threats forced Monopoli to build strong fortificacions which allowed them in 1529 to resist against the Armada of Charles V for three months, forcing the Spaniards to abandon the siege. However, the next year, Monopoli passed under Spanish rule, but remained a free city.

It became part of the newly-unified state Kingdom of Italy in 1860.

The city, lying in the south of Italy Mezzogiorno, enjoyed a certain economic development during the 60's, thanks to the opening of a Tognana (an important Italian ceramic manufacturer) industrial plant. The closure of this plant in the end of the 90's certainly worsened the city's economy; Monopoli's economic recovery in the latest year has mostly been due to new industries (the most important is the MerMec, which produces railway material) and the development of tourism, especially in the coast and the countryside

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Families

  • Great for children of all ages
  • Pets welcome

Bed & bathroom

  • Bedroom 1: King Bed
    Bedroom 2: King Bed
    Bedroom 3: King Bed
    Bedroom 4: King Bed
    Bedroom 5: King Bed
    Bedroom 6: King Bed
    Bedroom 7: King Bed
    Bedroom 8: Sofa Bed
    Bedroom 9: Double Bed Sofa Bed
    Bedroom 0: Double Bed
    Beds in other rooms: 2 Double Beds

Amenities

  • Wi-Fi available
  • Air conditioning
  • Shared outdoor pool (unheated)
  • Shared garden
  • Private garden
  • BBQ
  • Solarium or roof terrace
  • Balcony or terrace
  • Sea view
  • Boat available
  • Internet access
  • Central heating
  • Staffed property
  • Cooker
  • Fridge
  • Freezer
  • Toaster
  • Kettle
  • Dishwasher
  • Washing machine
  • Iron
  • TV
  • Fax machine
  • Hair dryer
  • Linen provided
  • Towels provided

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Access

  • Parking
  • Secure parking
  • Accessible for wheelchair users — please contact the owner for details before booking

Policies

Check in time:16:00, Check out time:10:00
If you have any questions about check-in or check-out times, please contact the owner/manager.
Payment
This rental can only be paid for online through Holiday Lettings using your credit/debit card or PayPal (never by bank or wire transfer).
Smoking
Yes, smoking allowed
Cancellation policy
View Policy

About the owner

Marco D.
Response rate:
70%
Calendar updated::
28 Apr 2017
Years listed:
5
Based in:
Italy
Overall rating:

Languages spoken: English, Italian


This Villa has 10 bedrooms, 9 bathrooms and sleeps 32. It’s been listed on Holiday Lettings since 02 Jul 2012. Located in Province of Bari, it has 3 reviews with an overall rating of 5. The average weekly rate varies from £407 to £7416.

The Owner has a response rate of 70% and the property’s calendar was last updated on 28 Apr 2017.

Map

Map and how to get there

Map

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