from £90 / night help Price for guests, Nights approx:

Duck's harbour – Home 6561064 Lodge

  • 2 bedrooms
  • 6 sleeps
  •  min stay varies

Duck's harbour – Home 6561064

Very Good Very Good – based on 7 reviews

  • Lodge
  • 2 bedrooms
  • 6 sleeps
  •  min stay varies

Lodge / 2 bedrooms / 1 bathroom / sleeps 6

Key Info

  • Nearest beach 110 km
  • Child friendly
  • Car essential
  • Pet friendly
  • Private garden

Description from owner

Description

Welcome to Duck's Harbour -your ultimate escape from the stresses of modern life.Our detached lodge is situated in the beautiful private and gated Riverside Island marina.The lodge is just 10 metres from the the River Lark.The accommodation offers excellent free fishing, bird watching and walks all year round (pets welcome).The lodge is cosy with every home comfort having been thought of.Now with free use of a 3 seater rowing boat with optional 55lb thrust electric motor and a 1 person canoe.Duck's Harbour is 1 of only 7 lodges that is not overlooked by other properties.

The village of Isleham offers 2 pubs within 1 mile (Rising sun and Griffin) a community centre with childrens play park ,post office, garage, Chinese takeaway,Farm shop , the excellent Merry Monk restaurant, and a Coop supermarket (open 7am -10pm).Fish and chip van Saturday afternoon.3 churches.Fans of Benedict Cumberbatch can retrace his steps in the film Wreckers which was shot against the backdrop

Welcome to Duck's Harbour -your ultimate escape from the stresses of modern life.Our detached lodge is situated in the beautiful private and gated Riverside Island marina.The lodge is just 10 metres from the the River Lark.The accommodation offers excellent free fishing, bird watching and walks all year round (pets welcome).The lodge is cosy with every home comfort having been thought of.Now with free use of a 3 seater rowing boat with optional 55lb thrust electric motor and a 1 person canoe.Duck's Harbour is 1 of only 7 lodges that is not overlooked by other properties.

The village of Isleham offers 2 pubs within 1 mile (Rising sun and Griffin) a community centre with childrens play park ,post office, garage, Chinese takeaway,Farm shop , the excellent Merry Monk restaurant, and a Coop supermarket (open 7am -10pm).Fish and chip van Saturday afternoon.3 churches.Fans of Benedict Cumberbatch can retrace his steps in the film Wreckers which was shot against the backdrop of village features such as the Griffin pub, Priory Garage, the Priory itself, the Post Office and the surrounding countryside.

Location description from owner

The England region

The Fens, also known as the Fenland(s), is a naturally marshy region in eastern England. Most of the fens were drained several centuries ago, resulting in a flat, damp, low-lying agricultural region.

A fen is the local name for an individual area of marshland or former marshland and also designates the type of marsh typical of the area, which has neutral or alkaline water chemistry and relatively large quantities of dissolved minerals, but few other plant nutrients.

Fenland primarily lies around the coast of the Wash; it reaches into four ceremonial counties: Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and a small area of Suffolk, as well as the historic county of Huntingdonshire. In whole it occupies an area of nearly 1,500 sq mi (3,900 km2).[

Most of the Fenland lies within a few metres of sea level. As with similar areas in the Netherlands, much of the Fenland originally consisted of fresh- or salt-water wetlands, which have been artificially drained and continue to be protected from floods by drainage banks and pumps. With the support of this drainage system, the Fenland has become a major arable agricultural region in Britain for grains and vegetables. The Fens are particularly fertile, containing around half of the grade 1 agricultural land in England.

The Fens have been referred to as the "Holy Land of the English" because of the churches and cathedrals of Ely, Ramsey, Crowland, Thorney and Peterborough. Other significant settlements in the Fens include Cambridge, Boston, Spalding, Wisbech and King's Lynn.The Fens is very low-lying compared with the chalk and limestone uplands that surround it – in most places no more than 10 m above sea level. Indeed, as a result of drainage and the subsequent shrinkage of the peat fens, many parts of the Fens now lie below mean sea level. Although one writer in the seventeenth century described the Fenland as all lying above sea level (in contrast to the Netherlands), the area is now home to the lowest land point in the United Kingdom, Holme Fen in Cambridgeshire, at around 2.75 metres below sea level.Within the Fens there are a few hills, which have historically been called "islands" as they remained dry when the low-lying fens around them were flooded. The largest of the fen-islands is the Isle of Ely, on which the cathedral city of Ely was built; its highest point is 39 m above mean sea-level.

Without artificial drainage and flood protection, the Fens would be liable to periodic flooding, particularly in winter due to the heavy load of water flowing down from the uplands and overflowing the rivers. Some areas of the Fens were once permanently flooded, creating small lakes or meres, while others were only flooded during periods of high water. In the pre-modern period arable farming was limited to the higher areas of the surrounding uplands, the fen islands and the so-called "Townlands", an arch of silt ground around the Wash where the towns had their arable fields. Though these lands were lower than the peat fens before the peat shrinkage began, the more stable silt soils were reclaimed by medieval farmers and embanked against any floods coming down from the peat areas or from the sea. The rest of the Fenland was dedicated to pastoral farming, fishing, fowling and the harvesting of reeds or sedge for thatch. In this way, the medieval and early modern Fens stood in contrast to the rest of southern England, which was primarily an arable agricultural region.

Since the advent of modern drainage in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the Fens have been radically transformed, so that today arable farming has almost entirely replaced pastoral and the economy of the Fens is heavily invested in the production of crops such as grains, vegetables and some cash crops such as rapeseed or canola.

Drainage in the Fenland consists of both river drainage and internal drainage of the land between the rivers. The internal drainage was organized by levels or districts, each of which includes the fen parts of one or several parishes. The details of the organization vary with the history of their development, but the areas include:

The Great Level of the Fens is the largest region of fen in eastern England: including the lower drainage basins of the River Nene and the Great Ouse, it covers approximately 500 sq mi (1,300 km2). It is also known as the Bedford Level, after Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford, who headed the so-called adventurers (investors) in the seventeenth century drainage in this area; his son became the first governor of the Bedford Level Corporation. In the seventeenth century, the Great Level was divided into the North, Middle and South Levels for the purposes of administration and maintenance. In the twentieth century, these levels have gained new boundaries, and include some fens which were never part of the jurisdiction of the Bedford Level Corporation.
The South Level lies to the southeast of the Ouse Washes and surrounds Ely, as it did in the seventeenth century.
The Middle Level currently lies between the Ouse Washes and the Nene, but historically lay between the Ouse Washes and Morton's Leam, a fifteenth-century canal which runs north of the town of Whittlesey.
The North Level now includes all of the fens in Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire between the Nene and the River Welland, but originally included only a small part of these lands, including those of the ancient parishes of Thorney and Crowland, but excluding most of Wisbech Hundred and Lincolnshire, which were under their own local jurisdictions.
Deeping Fen, in the southern part of Lincolnshire, lies between the River Welland and the River Glen with its tributary the Bourne Eau.
The Black Sluice District, much of which was known as the Lindsey Level when it was first drained in 1639, extends from the Glen and Bourne Eau to Swineshead. Its water is carried through to the Haven at Boston.

Isleham

Fresh, Local and Affordable Meat & Eggs
Thompson's Farm Butchers - a few minutes walk from the Lodge
Fenrose Farm, 1 Fen Bank, Isleham, CB7 5SL -
Also at the priory garage on Saturday mornings
Thompson's Farm Shop (at Fenrose Farm) is a very short walk from your Lodge (couple minutes). Thompson's Farm run a 5-Star hygiene rated butchers shop on the farm. They only sell their own produce:Pork, Bacon, Ham, Free Range Chicken and Eggs & 21 day hung Hereford Beef. They also make their own sausages and chipolatas ,which are a wonderful addition to their eggs and bacon for breakfast.

Fruit & Veg - Isleham & Surrounding Area
Isleham Village has two large allotments. From Spring to late Autumn/Early Winter you'll see road-side stalls selling all manner of veg and fruit (when in season).
Location of Local Veg Stalls; Seasonal
Location 1. There are two stalls located opposite the allotments at the end of Waterside as you head from the village to the Marina.
Location 2. There is often a stall in the Marina just outside the clubhouse which you can find if you turn left as you enter the Marina and follow the road to the car-park.

There are two great free-house pubs and a fine dining restaurant in the village. The two pubs also serve good quality pub food and there are live bands on almost every week on the weekends.
The Griffin (Free house) -
11 Church St, Isleham, CB7 5RX
Opening times: 7 days a week, 12pm till late
The Griffin is a warm pub boasting a wide choice of ales, larges, stouts and ciders on tap as well as the wines and spirits. The griffin also serves hot drinks (cappuccino, latte, tea etc).
Good Pub Food is served daily from 12pm - 2pm and 6pm - 9pm with a traditional roast served on Sundays.
The griffin has a beer garden with a children's play area and well behaved dogs are welcome at the pub. There is ample parking in the rear of the pub. The Griffin has a darts board and pool table and all major sporting events are shown on the large flat-screen television.
The Griffin hosts bands every Saturday and a popular jam session on Thursdays . Please see the information board in the Lodge for current bands at the Griffin.

The Rising Sun (Free house) -
11 Sun St, Isleham, CB7 5RT

The Rising Sun free house is an active pub that boasts an extensive drinks menu and serves good hearty pub food.
The Rising Sun in Isleham is an active sports pub with all the Sky Sports channels and three different televisions ensuring there is no cross-over when major sporting events are on.

Not only is the Rising Sun a great place to watch sport, you can also play darts on their competition level board or enjoy a game of pool in the front bar. The Rising Sun has a jukebox with a good mix of old and new.

The Rising Sun hosts bands on a regular basis. Please see the information board in the Lodge for current bands at the Rising Sun.
The Merry Monk (Restaurant) -
30 West St, Isleham, CB7 5SB

The Merry Monk is a genuine treat for the area. Great food, comfortable and welcoming atmosphere with a menu to make your mouth water.
Adrian, the owner and head chef, serves the highest quality British cuisine with a twist.
The menu changes all the time, making the most of Fresh, local & importantly; seasonal produce .There is always something new and exciting to try at the Merry Monk. So no matter how many times you visit you'll always be surprised.
Pricewise, the Merry Monk offers top-end cuisine at realistic prices. They do offer an early-bird menu and often have special taster-menu offers on.
Fish & Chip Van - Saturday Afternoon

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Families

  • Great for children of all ages
  • Pets welcome
  • Cot available
  • High chair available

Bed & bathroom

  • 2 Super King Beds, 1 Sofa Bed, 2 Single Beds, 1 Cot available
  • 1 Family bathroom

Amenities

  • Wi-Fi available
  • Private garden
  • BBQ
  • Balcony or terrace
  • Private fishing lake or river
  • Boat available
  • Internet access
  • Central heating
  • Cooker
  • Fridge
  • Freezer
  • Microwave
  • Toaster
  • Kettle
  • Dishwasher
  • Washing machine
  • Clothes dryer
  • Iron
  • High chair available
  • TV
  • DVD player
  • CD player
  • Telephone
  • Hair dryer
  • Linen provided
  • Towels provided

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Access

  • Parking
  • Not suitable for wheelchair users

Policies

Payment
This owner does not use online booking. Please contact them and they will be able to offer you a secure way to pay for your stay. Never pay for your holiday rental by wire transfer (such as Western Union or Moneygram) as this type of payment is untraceable.
Smoking
No smoking at this property
Cancellation policy
View Policy

About the owner

Marc And Nicky A
Response rate:
95%
Calendar updated::
26 Oct 2016
Years listed:
10
Based in:
United Kingdom
Overall rating:

Languages spoken: English


This Lodge has 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom and sleeps 6. It’s been listed on Holiday Lettings since 09 May 2015. Located in Isleham, it has 7 reviews with an overall rating of 4. The average weekly rate varies from £415 to £655.

The Owner has a response rate of 95% and the property’s calendar was last updated on 26 Oct 2016.

Map

Map and how to get there

Map

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