Cottage / 3 bedrooms / sleeps 6

Key Info
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car advised
  • Pets welcome
  • Private garden


Stable Cottage was formerly the stables for the Inn at Fossebridge, an historic family run 17th century coaching inn, and the cottage sits in the Inn's beautiful four acre grounds. Fossebridge is in the heart of the Cotswolds, located between Cirencester to the South and Stow-on-the-Wold to the North. Stable Cottage is ideally placed for exploring the surrounding countryside, including the picturesque Coln Valley, or visiting the many beautiful towns and villages of the Cotswolds.

The graded II listed stables were solidly built in Cotswold stone and have recently been converted to form a beautiful, single storey cottage. The character of the original stables has been retained via the incorporation of stable doors and original oak beams into the cottage, and enhanced by the quality of the new finishings, including oak doors, windows and skirting boards. The character of the cottage is complemented by its facilities, including wireless internet access, a flatscreen TV with DVD player and Sky, and a well presented kitchen.

Stable Cottage sleeps a maximum of 4+2 guests, in three bedrooms, with two bathrooms (with the +2 being bunk beds for children, which are in a small bedroom that connects the master bedroom to the rest of the cottage). There is a private outdoor area with a table and chairs, and the grounds of the Inn at Fossebridge are open to guests. Off street parking is available. Stable Cottage is an ideal location for families or groups of friends, looking for a peaceful retreat.

The cottage benefits from having access to all of the Inn's services, including private dining facilities.


The front door of Stable Cottage opens into a hallway. The following rooms are in the cottage, all on the ground floor:

•Living/dining room: A warm and cosy room, with one of the original oak beams from the stables and a beautiful tiled floor. There is comfy seating for five, plus a large beanbag, and a wooden dining table and chairs, seating six. There is a flatscreen TV, with integral DVD player and Sky TV;

•Kitchen: Opening directly onto the living/dining room, the kitchen is small, but well laid out, and contains an electric cooker and four ring hob, dishwasher, fridge freezer, microwave, kettle and toaster (clothes washing facilities can be provided by the Inn);

•Master bedroom: Accessed via bedroom 3, the master bedroom contains a king size bed and has an en-suite bathroom, with a bath with overhead shower, toilet and twin wash basin;

•Bedroom 2: Contains two single beds;

•Bedroom 3: A small room, which also gives access to the master bedroom, bedroom 3 contains two high quality oak bunk beds, which are suitable for children;

•Family bathroom: Contains a walk-in shower, toilet and wash basin.

At the front of Stable Cottage is a private outdoor area, with a table and chairs. The cottage and the outdoor area adjoin the beautiful four acre grounds of the Inn at Fossebridge, which guests have full access to.

Size Sleeps up to 6, 3 bedrooms
Rooms 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms and 1 En suites
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 2 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Birmingham 90 km, Nearest railway: Kemble 20 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes Pets welcome, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player
General Central heating, TV, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer
Furniture Double beds (1), Single beds (4), Cots (1), Dining seats for 6, Lounge seats for 5
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Outdoors Private garden
Access Parking, Suitable for people with restricted mobility, Not suitable for wheelchair users

The Cotswolds region


Fossebridge is a small hamlet, situated on the historic Fosse Way, a Roman road running all the way from Exeter to Lincoln. The location is perfect for exploring the entire Cotswold area and beyond, being eight miles north of Cirencester and 11 miles south of Stow-on-the-Wold.

The area around Fossebridge showcases rural England at its very best, with many beautiful walks right on the doorstep, in particular through the stunning Coln Valley.


The village of Chedworth is in the County of Gloucestershire, seven miles from Cirencester, five miles from Northleach and eleven miles from Cheltenham. It is close to the Roman Fosse Way and is roughly 600 feet above sea level. Chedworth is an attractive Cotswold village, with old and modern Cotswold stone houses hugging the steep sides of the valley, which extends for almost two miles along a tributary of the River Coln. The village remains unspoilt and off the beaten track, with the exception of the famous Chedworth Roman Villa, which is less than a mile from the village, as the crow flies, but approximately five miles away by road.

The area around Chedworth is renowned for its beautiful scenery, in particular the Coln Valley, and there are numerous public footpaths and trails accessible from the village.


For many, Northleach is a Cotswold secret. Tucked away from the busy A40, between undulating hills, it stands at a crossroads on the Roman Fosse Way, in an area of outstanding natural beauty. The streets in and around the ancient market place are rich in architectural interest, ranging from half-timbered Tudor houses and merchants' stores to the great House of Correction, (formerly 'The Cotswold Heritage Centre'), built in the 18th Century.

Above all, Northleach is a thriving small Cotswold town, which has successfully balanced its traditional commerce with the demands of tourism. When you walk through the town, it presents itself as a proud descendent of the great days of the wool trade, boasting the finest example of the Cotswold perpendicular style in the impressive Church of St Peter and Paul. Although wool is no longer the main business of the town, the marketplace is busy with trade and the local hostelries provide a lively service to both visitors and locals.

Most of the shops in Northleach are owned by independent proprietors and you will find something for everyone, from fresh bread and cakes, newspapers and magazines, to specialist wines, fine quality meats and cheese, dolls houses and furniture, music boxes, cosmetics, cards and souvenirs. Northleach also has a variety of eating places and public houses.

The Cotswolds

The Cotswolds are a range of hills in west-central England, sometimes called the "Heart of England". The name Cotswold means "sheep enclosure in rolling hillsides".

The Cotswolds are characterised by attractive small towns and villages, built of the underlying Cotswold stone (a yellow oolitic limestone). In the Middle Ages the wool trade made the Cotswolds prosperous and some of this money was put into the building of churches, leaving the area with a number of large handsome Cotswold stone "wool churches". The area remains affluent, which has encouraged the establishment of many high quality pubs, restaurants and antique shops.

Cotswold towns include Bourton-on-the-Water, Broadway, Burford, Chipping Norton, Cirencester, Moreton-in-Marsh, Northleach, Stow-on-the-Wold, Stroud and Winchcombe. The town of Chipping Campden is notable for being the home of the Arts and Crafts movement, founded by William Morris at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. William Morris lived occasionally in Broadway Tower, a folly, now part of a country park. Chipping Campden is also known for the annual Cotswold Olimpick Games, a celebration of sports and games dating back to the early 17th century. Famous places close to the Cotswolds include Stratford-upon-Avon, the birthplace of William Shakespeare, Cheltenham, home to the famous horse racing festival, and the beautiful university city of Oxford.

The Cotswolds is the largest Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in England and Wales. Whilst the beauty of the Cotswold AONB is intertwined with the villages that seem to almost grow out of the landscape, the Cotswolds were primarily designated as an AONB for the rare limestone grassland habitats as well as the old growth beech woodlands that typify the area. These habitat areas are also the last refuge for many other flora and fauna with some so endangered they are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. The uniqueness and value of the Cotswolds is engendered in the fact that five European Special Areas of Conservation, three National Nature Reserves and over 80 Sites of Special Scientific Interest are contained within the Cotswold AONB.


Food & Drink

The Inn at Fossebridge:

The property benefits from being located in the beautiful grounds of the Inn at Fossebridge, providing guests with access to all the Inn's facilities, including its excellent eating and drinking options. The Inn's traditional Cotswold bar and integral restaurant are located in the oldest part of the building and are a wonderful retreat, rustic and cosy, with flagstone floors, beamed ceilings, two open log fires, a log burning stove and mellow Cotswold stone walls. In the spring and summer months the four acres of gardens around the lake offer a wonderful spot to enjoy a drink or two, lunch on a sunny afternoon or dinner on a balmy evening.

The Inn also has two adjoining Georgian dining rooms, overlooking the gardens and lake, which offer private dining facilities, as well as facilities for larger parties. The Inn is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. There are different menus for lunch and dinner, as well as a Sunday lunch menu that changes weekly and separate children's menus.


For a small town, Northleach is fortunate to have a number of eating and drinking options, including:

•The Wheatsheaf Inn

•The Ox House Wine Company

•The Red Lion Inn

•The Sherborne Arms

Central Cotswolds:

There are many excellent places to eat and drink in the wider Central Cotswolds area, with the major towns of Cirencester, Cheltenham, Stroud, Stow-on-the-Wold, Bourton-on-the-Water, Northleach and Burford containing a wide variety of tea shops, pubs and restaurants, catering for most tastes and budgets.


The list below is a very small sample to give you a flavour for the wide range of attractions and activities that are available in and around the Cotswolds. Tourist Information centres are located in all the main Cotswold towns.


•Blenheim Palace

•Chedworth Roman Villa

•Warwick Castle



•Cheltenham race course

•Cotswold Farm Park

•Batsford Arboretum

•Broadway Tower Country Park

•Snowshill Manor & Garden


Activities available in the Cotswolds include walking, cycling, horse riding, golf, swimming and rock climbing.

Further food & drink and activities information is available on the Character Cottages website.