List your home
Apply filters
£ to

Log cabin | 3 bedrooms | sleeps 42

Key Info
  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Great for children of all ages 5
  • Car advised
  • No pets allowed

This is a great location for groups and family reunions. There are 3 six berth cabins and 6 four berth cabins with their own fully fitted open plan kitchen/living area. The bedrooms are light and comfortable with 3 twin rooms which share a bathroom. Each cabin has comfortable sofas, dining table and chairs and TV.

Outside there is a decked area with table and chairs for those warm summer evenings and lunchtime snacks.

Size Sleeps up to 42, 3 bedrooms
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised, Wheelchair users
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Birmingham, Nearest railway: Ashchurch
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

General Central heating, TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron
Utilities Cooker, Fridge
Rooms 3 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms of which 10 Shower rooms
Furniture Single beds (38), Double beds (2), Dining seats for 42, Lounge seats for 42
Other Linen provided
Outdoors Balcony or terrace, BBQ, Bicycles available, Private fishing lake or river
Access Parking, Wheelchair users
Further details indoors

All properties are STRICTLY NON-SMOKING and are tastefully decorated. The cabins are cosy but light and spacious enough for nights in playing card games or watching TV after a hard days cyling or riding.

These are great for sensible older stag and hen groups with the bonus of a party room with private bar facilities for a small charge.

optional extras include cycle hire, horse riding, carp fishing, beauty treatments/therapies.

Further details outdoors

Each cabin has a decked sun terrace with dining table and chairs and space for a BBQ if you care to cook outdoors.

Further details

All properties are strictly NON-SMOKING.

Rental changeover day in Spring and Summer is Saturday only.

Weekend and nightly bookings sometimes available during off peak dates.

Large groups welcomed. There are 54 bed spaces in 3 six berth cabins, 6 four berth cabins and 6 twin rooms !!!

Ideal for Hen and Stag weekends, school groups, company team building events, family reunions.

The Central England/Cotswolds region

Tewkesbury is situated on the border of Gloucestershire and Worcestershire and easily reached by road. It is of great historical interest.

Twyning is a few miles north of Tewkesbury on the A38, very near the M50, giving easy access to Ross on Wye and beyond. Twyning has a village green, pub by the river and a couple of shops.

Tewkesbury holds a unique position of being on the edge of the Cotswolds but also forms part of the Severn Vale with the river Severn meeting the river Avon at the town. Tewkesbury has one of the best medieval streetscapes in the country and this can easily be seen at every turn.

Tewkesbury

Tewkesbury was the site of the Battle of Tewkesbury on 4 May 1471. At the “Bloody Meadow,” south of the town, Edward IV's Yorkist forces defeated the House of Lancaster in a historic battle of the Wars of the Roses with a bloody aftermath. Tewkesbury was incorporated during the reign of Elizabeth I.

Like many towns in the west of England, Tewkesbury played an important part in the development of religious dissent. English Dissenters in Tewkesbury contributed to the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, and Samuel Jones ran an important academy for dissenters, whose students included Samuel Chandler, future archbishop Thomas Secker and Joseph Butler, in the early 18th century.[4]

Historically, Tewkesbury is a market town, serving the local rural area. It underwent some expansion in the period following World War II. Tewkesbury has also been a centre for flour milling for many centuries, and the water mill, the older Abbey Mill still stands though it has now been converted for residential use. Until recently flour was still milled at a more modern mill a short way upriver on the site of the town quay; parts of the mill dated to 1865 when it was built for Healings and it was once thought to be the largest and most modern flour mill in the world. The Mill has, in the course of its history, had three forms of transport in and out: road, railway, and canal and river barge. Whilst the railway line was brought up along with the rest of the Tewkesbury to Upton-upon-Severn railway line (originally running to Malvern) in 1961, the two barges "Chaceley" and "Tirley" remained in service right up to 1998 transporting grain from Avonmouth and Sharpness to the plant. However, the mill closed in November 2006, ending at least 800 years of milling in Tewkesbury[5] and 140 years of milling on that particular site.[6] The two barges were also sold and left Tewkesbury for the last time in March 2007.[7]

The town also hosts a large Armed forces vehicle supply and maintenance depot at nearby Ashchurch. During the early 1990s, several local shops and businesses closed, including the town's Roses Theatre; the latter re-opened in 1996.

The Tewkesbury War Memorial, locally known as the CrossThe town features many notable Tudor buildings, but its major claim to fame is Tewkesbury Abbey, a fine Norman Abbey, originally part of a monastery, which was saved from the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII after being bought by the townspeople for £453 to use as their parish church.[16] Most of the monastery buildings, as well as the vineyards, were destroyed during this time. The Abbey Mill however still remains, resting upon the Mill Avon, a channel built by the monks. The weir exists to this day, and the channel represents one of the biggest projects in Tewkesbury's history, though the present sluice gate dates only from the 1990s, replacing two installed in the 1930s. The Abbey Mill is also sometimes known as "Abel Fletcher's Mill", but this is simply the name given to it in Dinah Craik's novel John Halifax, Gentleman, whose setting Norton Bury is based on Tewkesbury (see the Tewkesbury in Literature section below).

The Abbey is also thought to be the site of the place where the hermit "Theoc" once lived. The great Romanesque arch on the west front is particularly striking, and the stained glass window at this end has recently been restored. The monastery was founded by the Despensers as a family mausoleum, and the Despenser and Neville tombs are stunning examples of small-scale late medieval stonework. The tower is believed to be the largest Norman tower still in existence (though that at Norwich Cathedral is another strong contender). The tower once had a wooden spire which may have taken the total height of the building to as much as 260 feet (79 m), but this was unfortunately blown off in a heavy storm on Easter Monday 1559; the present pinnacles and battlements were added in 1600 to give the tower a more "finished" look. The height to the top of the pinnacles is 148 feet (45 m). The Abbey is thought to be the third largest church in Britain that is not a cathedral (after Westminster Abbey and Beverley Minster). From end to end it measures 312 feet (95 m), though prior to the destruction of the original Lady Chapel (also at the time of the dissolution), the Abbey's total length was 375 feet (114 m). The Abbey is a parish church, still used for daily services, and is believed to be the second-largest parish church in England, again, after Beverley Minster.[17]

The Royal Hop Pole, mentioned in 'The Pickwick papers'Tewkesbury claims Gloucestershire's oldest public house, the Black Bear, dating from 1308.[18] Other notable buildings are the Royal Hop Pole Hotel in Church Street (which has recently been converted into a part of the Wetherspoons pub chain with the discovery of a former medieval banqueting hall in the structure), mentioned in Charles Dickens' The Pickwick Papers, the Bell Hotel, a large half-timbered structure opposite the Abbey gateway, and the House of the Nodding Gables in the High Street. The historic Abbey Cottages, over 500 years old, were rescued from dereliction in the 1970s; one houses a museum, the others are residential homes and commercial offices. At the Tudor House Hotel in the High Street however, although it is indeed chiefly a Tudor building, the frontage comprises artificial half-timbering attached to a brick-built facade. The local branch of Store Twenty-One (formerly Marks & Spencer and before that Iceland) was once the location of the Swan Hotel, where a balcony still is today and from which local election results were announced[citation needed].

Also notable to the town's architecture is the Old Baptist Chapel (on Church Street) built in about 1655, as one of the earliest examples from that denomination, behind the chapel is a small cemetery of those who were members of the chapel.

Just to the west of the town is Thomas Telford's impressive Mythe Bridge over the River Severn, a cast-iron structure with a 170-foot span, opened in 1826. Tewkesbury's other notable bridge is the stone-built King John's Bridge over the Avon, commissioned by King John in the late 12th century as part of improvements to the main road from Gloucester to Worcester. Original stonework can still be seen on its north side; the bridge was considerably widened in the mid- to -late 1950's to meet modern traffic requirements.

Guest reviewsPowered by TripAdvisor

Guest reviews no reviews

Guest reviews Powered by TripAdvisor

Help other travellers decide where to stay

This holiday home hasn’t got any reviews yet. The average rating on Holiday Lettings is four out of five. This place could be newly added or perhaps it’s a well kept secret. Either way, it’s time to reveal all.

Be the first to write a review

This advert is created and maintained by the advertiser; we can only publish adverts in good faith as we don't own, manage or inspect any of the properties. We advise you to familiarise yourself with our terms of use.

Close

2 Nights min stay

Changeover day Flexible

from£710/nighthelp

This is the estimated nightly price based on a weekly stay. Contact the advertiser to confirm the price - it varies depending on when you stay and how long for.

Book your stay

*
*
*

Subtotal

 Your dates are available

Contact the manager

Close

Payment options

You need to pay through the Holiday Lettings website to ensure your payment is protected. We can’t protect your payment if you don’t pay through us.Learn more

You're booking with

Elizabeth Coe (Property Manager Elizabeth Cole)

  • 4 Years listed

80% Response rate

Calendar last updated:05 Sep 2014

Based in United Kingdom

Languages spoken
  • English

Payment accepted

Paypal accepted

Credit cards accepted

Mobile
+44(0)7980600365
Fax
+44(0)1242234729

Also consider

Cheltenham
134 properties
Chipping Campden
85 properties
Stroud
77 properties
Malvern
58 properties
Bourton on the Water
51 properties
Ross on Wye
50 properties
Broadway
37 properties
Worcester
35 properties
Gloucester
33 properties
Moreton-in-Marsh
31 properties
Tewkesbury
26 properties
Evesham
24 properties
Ledbury
19 properties
Clifton on Teme
19 properties
Blockley
14 properties
Winchcombe
12 properties
Alcester
11 properties
Pershore
8 properties
Oddington
8 properties
Sedgeberrow
6 properties

Start a new search