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Villa d'suite

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Villa | 3 bedrooms | sleeps 6

Key Info
  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Nearest beach 0 km
  • Swimming pool
  • Suitable for children over
  • Car advised
  • Air conditioning
  • No pets allowed
  • Private garden

Designed by Australian designer Dean Kempnich, villa d’suite truly refines the word “Bali Modern”. Unmistakable Balinese rooflines mix with modern yet pleasing painting color schemes, combining lush tropical garden surrounding the villa, this is a holiday accommodation like no other.

Centrally located on the fashionable area of Bali – Oberoi, this villa sits right next to the famed Oberoi hotel and Kudeta, one of the best culinary establishments to be found anywhere on the island. Other famed restaurants and eateries such as the restaurant at the legian, Rumors, Mykonos, hu’u, La Luciola, and not mention all the unique boutiques and shops for your shopping therapy, are all conveniently located within walking distances. Literally steps away from the golden beaches of Petitinget, the location is the next best thing to staying in a beachfront property.

Upon stepping into this brand new villa, the immediate feeling is one of youthful energy and luxurious comfort. The villa’s designer touches are instantly evident from the very first sight; colour combination of the walls and well placed, carefully selected art objects: modern painting and turn of the century Bali photographs on the walls, and primitive wood/stone carvings that sits on polished wood pedestals. Combined with refined designer furniture, and views of tropical greenery all around, the villa permeates the new beat of Bali.

The modern touch continues into the garden and pool area, merging the inside of the house with the outside surroundings. Locally available volcanic stones called “Batu Candi” are used extensively through out the outdoor areas, a perfect example of how the use of natural materials can be adapted into a tropical contemporary design.

The lush tropical garden design takes on an almost geomantic approach, which compliments the contemporary design of the interior. Belonging mostly to the palm and heliconia species, the plants used through out the garden truly reflected the feeling of tropical living. Two “Batu Candi” sundecks rest at either side of the natural stone pool, one exposed to the sunlight, which is perfect for sunbathing, while the other placed under three mature trees, perfectly suited for lying under the shade for some long neglected siestas.

Roofed in traditional Balinese tile roof, this one-storied villa is comprised of three bedrooms; two on either side of the semi-open living area flanked by a 2- tiered pond, and another to the one side of the air-conditioned living room. All three bedrooms have it’s own ensuite bathrooms and all equipped with cable TV.

The living areas of the villa are the best combination of both worlds: indoors and outdoors. The indoor living room is fully air-conditioned; a rarity to be found on most balinese villas, and houses the sofa area with audio-visual systems housed in cabinets. Entertainment facilities consist of a cable television, DVD player, and stereo system – also supplied are a selection of DVDs, books and board games. To the other end of this area sits a long, highly polished table that enables 8 to sit and dine comfortably. Behind the dinning table is the pantry with mini-bar, refrigerator, and sink. All around are ceiling to floor windows, which opens up to the semi-out door living area, effectively combines the two into one large living space. Here one finds a six-person round glass top table with comfortable rattan woven dinning chair. To the other side, a 2 piece matching rattan woven sofas is placed. With ceiling fans servicing both areas, this is a perfect place to spend a balmy Balinese afternoon, while listening to the flowing sounds of water coming from the circulating 2-tiered pond and the Jacuzzi further out.

All floors are made of white Terrazzo tiles divided by glass, which again shows the resourcefulness of the designer when it comes to the combination of materials used. The polished Terrazzos continue into the 3 air-conditioned bedrooms, where the feeling of tropical contemporary designs persevered, complete with a split-unit air conditioner, wooden built-in closets, a personal safety box and large windows and doors opening onto the garden or pool. All bedrooms feature ensuite bathrooms, which has separate shower and tub areas, and also uses Terrazzo through out the floor, tub and washbasin. All bedrooms are equipped with a cable television, making a lazy morning even harder to get up to.

This villa’s design accomplished in capturing what “Bali Modern” is all about: contemporary design, minimalism, space, and attention to detail. With its urban location on an almost beach front location, it is ideally situated for holiday makers who want to enjoy the best of what the Oberoi area has to offer.

Size Sleeps up to 6, 3 bedrooms
Nearest beach Kudeta 150 m
Will consider Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 100 m
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Ngurah Rai International 15 km
Family friendly Suitable for children over 5
Notes No pets allowed, Yes, smoking allowed

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Jacuzzi or hot tub, Internet access, DVD player, Staffed property
General Air conditioning, CD player, Telephone, Fax machine, Pool or snooker table, Safe, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Hair dryer
Utilities Cooker, Microwave, Fridge
Rooms 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms of which 3 En suites
Furniture Double beds (3), Cots (1), Dining seats for 8, Lounge seats for 4
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Outdoors Balcony or terrace, Private garden
Access Secure parking
Further details indoors

All 3 bedrooms are equipped with the following:

- Queen bed

- Cable TV

- Cabinet

- Air condition

- 2 night table with lights

- Ceiling lights

- Ensuite bathroom with toilet, shower stall, bath tub, hair dryer

Further details outdoors

Private garden with tropical plants all around the villa

Large private swimming pool with deck chair, jacuzi for 4

Further details

Terms and Conditions:

All rate are quoted in US Dollars and inclusive of daily American Breakfast, 21% government ax and service charge, transfer in/out airport upon request (chargeable).

Upon check-in, a photocopy of the booking tenant’s passport is required

The Bali/Lesser Sunda Islands region

Bali is a province in the country of Indonesia. The island is located in the westernmost end of the Lesser Sunda Islands, lying between Java to the west and Lombok to the east. It is one of the country's 33 provinces with the provincial capital at Denpasar towards the south of the island. The province covers a few small neighbouring islands as well as the isle of Bali.

With a population recorded as 3,891,428 in the 2010 census, the island is home to most of Indonesia's Hindu minority. It is also the largest tourist destination in the country and is renowned for its highly developed arts, including traditional and modern dance, sculpture, painting, leather, metalworking, and music. Bali, a tourist haven for decades, has seen a further surge in tourist numbers in recent years.

Balinese culture was strongly influenced by Indian, Chinese, and particularly Hindu culture, beginning around the 1st century AD. The name Bali dwipa ("Bali island") has been discovered from various inscriptions, including the Blanjong pillar inscription written by Sri Kesari Warmadewa in 914 AD and mentioning "Walidwipa". It was during this time that the complex irrigation system subak was developed to grow rice. Some religious and cultural traditions still in existence today can be traced back to this period. The Hindu Majapahit Empire (1293–1520 AD) on eastern Java founded a Balinese colony in 1343. When the empire declined, there was an exodus of intellectuals, artists, priests, and musicians from Java to Bali in the 15th century.

The island of Bali lies 3.2 km (2 mi) east of Java, and is approximately 8 degrees south of the equator. Bali and Java are separated by the Bali Strait. East to west, the island is approximately 153 km (95 mi) wide and spans approximately 112 km (69 mi) north to south; its land area is 5,632 km².

Bali's central mountains include several peaks over 3,000 metres in elevation. The highest is Mount Agung (3,031 m), known as the "mother mountain" which is an active volcano. Mountains range from centre to the eastern side, with Mount Agung the easternmost peak. Bali's volcanic nature has contributed to its exceptional fertility and its tall mountain ranges provide the high rainfall that supports the highly productive agriculture sector. South of the mountains is a broad, steadily descending area where most of Bali's large rice crop is grown. The northern side of the mountains slopes more steeply to the sea and is the main coffee producing area of the island, along with rice, vegetables and cattle. The longest river, Ayung River, flows approximately 75 km.

The island is surrounded by coral reefs. Beaches in the south tend to have white sand while those in the north and west have black sand. The largest city is the provincial capital, Denpasar, near the southern coast. Its population is around 491,500 (2002). Bali's second-largest city is the old colonial capital, Singaraja, which is located on the north coast and is home to around 100,000 people. Other important cities include the beach resort, Kuta, which is practically part of Denpasar's urban area, and Ubud, situated at the north of Denpasar, is the island's cultural centre.

Three small islands lie to the immediate south east and all are administratively part of the Klungkung regency of Bali: Nusa Penida, Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Ceningan. These islands are separated from Bali by the Badung Strait.

To the east, the Lombok Strait separates Bali from Lombok and marks the biogeographical division between the fauna of the Indomalayan ecozone and the distinctly different fauna of Australasia. The transition is known as the Wallace Line, named after Alfred Russel Wallace, who first proposed a transition zone between these two major biomes. When sea levels dropped during the Pleistocene ice age, Bali was connected to Java and Sumatra and to the mainland of Asia and shared the Asian fauna, but the deep water of the Lombok Strait continued to keep Lombok and the Lesser Sunda archipelago isolated.

The rich coral reefs around the coast, particularly around popular diving spots such as Tulamben, Amed, Menjangan or neighboring Nusa Penida, host a wide range of marine life, for instance Hawksbill Turtle, Giant Sunfish, Giant Manta Ray, Giant Moray Eel, Bumphead Parrotfish, Hammerhead Shark, Reef Shark, barracuda, and sea snakes. Dolphins are commonly encountered on the north coast near Singaraja and Lovina.

A team of scientists conducted a survey from 29 April 2011 to 11 May 2011 at 33 sea sites around Bali. They discovered 952 species of reef fish of which 8 were new discoveries at Pemuteran, Gilimanuk, Nusa Dua, Tulamben and Candidasa, and 393 coral species, including two new ones at Padangbai and between Padangbai and Amed. The average coverage level of healthy coral was 36 percent (better than in Raja Ampat and Halmahera by 29 percent or in Fakfak and Kaimana by 25 percent) with the highest coverage found in Gili Selang and Gili Mimpang in Candidasa, Karangasem regency.

Many plants have been introduced by humans within the last centuries, particularly since the 20th century, making it sometimes hard to distinguish what plants are really native. Among the larger trees the most common are: Banyan trees, Jackfruit, coconuts, bamboo species, acacia trees and also endless rows of coconuts and banana species. Numerous flowers can be seen: hibiscus, frangipani, bougainvillea, poinsettia, oleander, jasmine, water lily, lotus, roses, begonias, orchids and hydrangeas exist. On higher grounds that receive more moisture, for instance around Kintamani, certain species of fern trees, mushrooms and even pine trees thrive well. Rice comes in many varieties. Other plants with agricultural value include: salak, mangosteen, corn, Kintamani orange, coffee and water spinach.

The tourism industry is primarily focused in the south, while significant in the other parts of the island as well. The main tourist locations are the town of Kuta (with its beach), and its outer suburbs of Legian and Seminyak (which were once independent townships), the east coast town of Sanur (once the only tourist hub), in the center of the island Ubud, to the south of the Ngurah Rai International Airport, Jimbaran, and the newer development of Nusa Dua and Pecatu.

An offshoot of tourism is the growing real estate industry. Bali real estate has been rapidly developing in the main tourist areas of Kuta, Legian, Seminyak and Oberoi. Most recently, high-end 5 star projects are under development on the Bukit peninsula, on the south side of the island. Million dollar villas are being developed along the cliff sides of south Bali, commanding panoramic ocean views. Foreign and domestic (many Jakarta individuals and companies are fairly active) investment into other areas of the island also continues to grow. Land prices, despite the worldwide economic crisis, have remained stable.

Bali received the Best Island award from Travel and Leisure in 2010. The island of Bali won because of its attractive surroundings (both mountain and coastal areas), diverse tourist attractions, excellent international and local restaurants, and the friendliness of the local people. According to BBC Travel released in 2011, Bali is one of the World's Best Islands, rank in second after Greece.

On 21 December 2011 construction started on the Nusa Dua-Benoa-Ngurah Rai International Airport toll road which will also provide a special lane for motorcycles. This is expected to be finished by April 2013 before the Apec Summit and the Bali Summer Summit in 2013. The project will go through 2 kilometers of mangrove forest and through 2.3 kilometers of beach, both within 5.4 hectares area. The elevated toll road will be built over the mangrove forest on 18,000 concrete pillars which will occupy 2 hectares of mangroves forest. This will be compensated by new planting of 300,000 mangrove trees along the road. On 21 December 2011 the Dewa Ruci 450 meters underpass has also started on the busy Dewa Ruci junction near Bali Kuta Galeria.

To solve chronic traffic problems, the province will build a toll road connecting Serangan with Tohpati, a toll road connecting Kuta, Denpasar and Tohpati and a flyover connecting Kuta and Ngurah Rai Airport.

Bali is renowned for its diverse and sophisticated art forms, such as painting, sculpture, woodcarving, handcrafts, and performing arts. Balinese percussion orchestra music, known as gamelan, is highly developed and varied. Balinese performing arts often portray stories from Hindu epics such as the Ramayana but with heavy Balinese influence. Famous Balinese dances include pendet, legong, baris, topeng, barong, gong keybar, and kecak (the monkey dance). Bali boasts one of the most diverse and innovative performing arts cultures in the world, with paid performances at thousands of temple festivals, private ceremonies, or public shows.

Seminyak

Located within walking distance of the famous Petitenget Beach and busy restaurant district of Jalan Laksmana, this villa is within easy striking distance of many of the islands hotspots such as Lalu Ciola, The Living Room, Hu'u, Mykonos and Kudeta Restaurant. So many famed restaurants and eateries here this street is otherwise called the "eat street". To be found also many night spots/lounges such as kudeta, hu'u, W lounge, potatoe head etc.

Besides the retaurants, we have a "weekend market" right infront of the gate, where you can shop for many balinese cothing and souvenirs. All along Jalan Laksmana you'll also discover unique boutiques selling expat and local designer fashionable items.

Through the small road beside the villa "Jalan Sari Dewi" you'll come to Jalan Dyana Pura, otherwise known as "drink street" where many pubs and night entertaiment establishments on the island are based.

It is about 20 minutes from Ngurah Rai International airport, 25 minutes to Tanah Lot Temple - Nirwana Bali Golf Course designed by Greg Norman (The Shark) - Le Meridien Resort. To the north just 35 minutes drive away is the cultural center of Ubud famous for its woodcarvings and assorted arts and crafts.

This advert is created and maintained by the advertiser; we can only publish adverts in good faith as we don't own, manage or inspect any of the properties. We advise you to familiarise yourself with our terms of use.

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Whung Wey Y.

95% Response rate

Calendar last updated:27 Aug 2014

Based in Indonesia

Languages spoken
  • English

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