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Vatican Apartment -freeWIFI,TV SAT,AC,subway 250mt

from £65 /night help Price for guests, Nights

Excellent 5/5 Score from 3 reviews

from £65 /night help Price for guests, Nights

Estimated nightly price based on a weekly stay. Excludes fees (if applicable). Enter your dates to see the total cost.

livingroom

Need more information about booking Home 846647 ?

Apartment / 1 bedrooms / sleeps 4

Key Info
  • Nearest beach 30 km
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car not necessary
  • Air conditioning
  • No pets allowed

VATICAN APARTMENT HOLIDAY

TOURIST OFFICE OF ROME CAPITAL

LICENSE No. 568

ALL RULES AND SAFETY STANDARDS ARE MET

Cheerful one bedroom apartment of 75 sq.mt. with two balconies, bright and spacious and conveniently located on the second floor of a building (with elevator) in the Aurelio neighbourhood, surrounded by restaurants, pubs, street shops, supermarkets, and close to the Vatican and St. Peter, (the subway is at 250 meters and buses in front of the building).

The apartment, characterized by marble flooring and coloured walls, can comfortably sleep up to 2+2people (the 3td or 4th person (max 18 years new rules Office Turism) is hosted with folding bed on request).

The entrance to the apartment gives access to all its rooms. The living room, with a double sofa and a dining corner with a comfortable round table for 4, leads out onto one of the 2 balconies. The separate eat-in kitchen is nice and bright and fully equipped, washing machine, fridge, freezer, microwave oven and kettle. The heating is centralized. The bedroom and the living room are equipped with air conditioning, in the living room there is the TV SAT, PC whit internet ADSL and free WIFI.

The bedroom offers a double bed and large wardrobe and has the access to the second balcony. The bathroom is with shower.

In the apartment you will find a large selection of guide books in different languages, booklets and maps provided by the Tourist Office of Rome.

At the arrival you will find in the kitchen a welcome pack with pasta, tomato sauce, coffee, marmalade and other items for your first dinner and breakfast.

Within walking distance you can reach: bars, restaurants, pizzerias, fruit market, supermarkets, a pharmacy, MC Donald's, several bancomat and a garage

The metro station "Baldo degli Ubaldi" (Line A) is located 100 meters from the apartment; from there it's possible to reach in few minutes St. Peter's, the Vatican, Spanish Steps, Trevi Fountain and all the other main attractions and museums in Rome.

A bus stop is located in front of the building, where it's possible to catch bus 46 and 49 to reach in few minutes St. Peter's, the Vatican, Venice Square, Navona Square and all the other attractions and museums in the centre. There is also a night bus (46N) that bring you back home after midnight.

Additional Service

If you arrive late you can find at home the foods that you like.

Write to us a list and we buy it for you at no extra cost, but only the repayment of the receipt of the supermarket.

We can also arrange a private transfer service from/to airport Ciampino or Fiumicino at 45 euros up to 3 persons , luggage included, 55euros for 4 people. The driver will wait for you at the arrival terminal and will drive you directly to the apartment.

Choose Vatican Apartment for your vacation in Rome, you will feel home away from home.

Read our guestbook and see what other guests have written about their Rome rental experience.

Size Sleeps up to 4, 1 bedrooms
Nearest beach fregene 30 km
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month)
Access Car not necessary
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: fiumicino 40 km, Nearest railway: Termini Station 4 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player
General Central heating, Air conditioning, TV, CD player, Safe, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 1 bedroom, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture Double beds (1), Single beds (2), Dining seats for 4, Lounge seats for 4
Other Linen provided, Towels provided
Access Lift access

The Lazio region

The Italian word Lazio descends from the Latin word Latium. The name of the region also survives in the tribal designation of the ancient population of Latins, Latini in the Latin language spoken by them and passed on to the city-state of Ancient Rome. Although the demography of ancient Rome was multi-ethnic, including, for example, Etruscans and other Italics besides the Latini, the latter were the dominant constituent. In Roman mythology, the tribe of the Latini took their name from king Latinus. Apart from the mythical derivation of Lazio given by the ancients as the place where Jupiter "lay hidden" from his father seeking to kill him, a major modern etymology is that Lazio comes from the Latin word "latus", meaning "wide", expressing the idea of "flat land" meaning the Roman Campagna. Much of Lazio is in fact flat or rolling. The lands originally inhabited by the Latini were extended into the territories of the Samnites, the Marsi, the Hernici, the Aequi, the Aurunci and the Volsci, all surrounding Italic tribes. This larger territory was still called Latium, but it was divided into Latium adiectum or Latium Novum, the added lands or New Latium, and Latium Vetus, or Old Latium, the older, smaller region.

The northern border of Lazio was the Tiber river, which divided it from Etruria.

The emperor Augustus officially united almost all of present-day Italy into a single geo-political entity, Italia, dividing it into eleven regions. Lazio – together with the present region of Campania immediately to the southeast of Lazio and the seat of Neapolis – became Region I.

After the Gothic War (535-554) and the Byzantine conquest, this region regained its freedom, because the "Roman Duchy" became the property of the Eastern Emperor. However, the long wars against the barbarian Longobards weakened the region, which was seized by the Roman Bishop who already had several properties in those territories.

The strengthening of the religious and ecclesiastical aristocracy led to continuous power struggles between lords and the Roman bishop until the middle of the 16th century. Innocent III tried to strengthen his own territorial power, wishing to assert his authority in the provincial administrations of Tuscia, Campagna and Marittima through the Church's representatives, in order to reduce the power of the Colonna family. Other popes tried to do the same. During the period when the papacy resided in Avignon, France (1309–1377), the feudal lords' power increased due to the absence of the Pope from Rome. Small communes, and Rome above all, opposed the lords' increasing power, and with Cola di Rienzo, they tried to present themselves as antagonists of the ecclesiastical power. However, between 1353 and 1367, the papacy regained control of Lazio and the rest of the Papal States.

From the middle of the 16th century, the papacy politically unified Lazio with the Papal States[citation needed], so that these territories became provincial administrations of St. Peter's estate; governors in Viterbo, in Marittima and Campagna, and in Frosinone administered them for the papacy.

Lazio comprised the short-lived Roman Republic, in which it became a puppet state of the First French Republic under the forces of Napoleon Bonaparte. The Republic existed from 15 February 1798 until Lazio was returned to the Papal States in October 1799. In 1809, Lazio was annexed to the French Empire, but returned under the Pope in 1815.

On 20 September 1870 the capture of Rome, during the reign of Pope Pius IX, and France's defeat at Sedan, completed Italian unification, and Lazio was incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy.

Rome

In Rome's Regal period (753-509 BC), the area across the Tiber belonged to the hostile Etruscans: the Romans named it Ripa Etrusca (Etruscan bank). Rome conquered it to gain control of and access to the river from both banks, but was not interested in building on that side of the river. In fact, the only connection between Trastevere and the rest of the city was a small wooden bridge called the Pons Sublicius (Latin: "bridge built on wooden piles").

By the time of the Republic c. 509 BC, the number of sailors and fishermen making a living from the river had increased, and many had taken up residence in Trastevere. Immigrants from the East also settled there, mainly Jews and Syrians. The area began to be considered part of the city under Augustus, who divided Rome into 14 regions (regiones in Latin); modern Trastevere was the XIV and was called Trans Tiberim.

Since the end of the Roman Republic the quarter was also the center of an important Jewish community,[1] which inhabited there until the end of the Middle Ages.

With the wealth of the Imperial Age, several important figures decided to build their villae in Trastevere, including Clodia, (Catullus' "friend") and Julius Caesar (his garden villa, the Horti Caesaris). The regio included two of the most ancient churches in Rome, the Titulus Callixti, later called the Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere, and the Titulus Cecilae, Santa Cecilia in Trastevere.

In order to have a stronghold on the right Bank and to control the Gianicolo hill, Transtiberim was partially included by Emperor Aurelian (270–275) inside the wall erected to defend the city against the Germanic tribes.

In the Middle Ages Trastevere had narrow, winding, irregular streets; moreover, because of the mignani (structures on the front of buildings) there was no space for carriages to pass. At the end of the 15th century these mignani were removed. Nevertheless, Trastevere remained a maze of narrow streets. There was a strong contrast between the large, opulent houses of the upper classes and the small, dilapidated houses of the poor. The streets had no pavement until the time of Sixtus IV at the end of the 15th century. At first bricks were used, but these were later replaced by sampietrini (cobble stones), which were more suitable for carriages. Thanks to its partial isolation (it was "beyond the Tiber") and to the fact that its population had been multicultural since the ancient Roman period, the inhabitants of Trastevere, called Trasteverini, developed a culture of their own. In 1744 Benedict XIV modified the borders of the rioni, giving Trastevere its modern limits.

Modern day

Nowadays, Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by medieval houses. At night, natives and tourists alike flock to its many pubs and restaurants, but much of the original character of Trastevere remains. The area is also home to several foreign academic institutions including The American University of Rome and John Cabot University (both of which are private American universities), the American Academy in Rome, the Rome campus of the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, the Canadian University of Waterloo School of Architecture (between the months of September and December), and the American Pratt Institute School of Architecture therefore serving as home to an international student body.

The unique character of this neighborhood has attracted artists, foreign expats, and many famous people. In the sixties and seventies, the American musicians/composers Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of the group Musica Elettronica Viva, lived in Via della Luce. Sergio Leone, the director of Spaghetti Westerns, grew up in Viale Glorioso (there is a marble plaque to his memory on the wall of the apartment building), and went to a Catholic private school in the neighborhood. Ennio Morricone, the film music composer, went to the same school, and for one year was in the same class as Sergio Leone.

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Review 1-3 of 3

3 Jun 2014

5/5

"Home away from home"

This apartment has everything you need and from the correspondence booking the apartment, arriving - information and welcome pack, comfort during the stay. Location near public transport and supermarket. This apartment and its owners organisation comes highly recommended.
Thank-you Maurizio

22 Apr 2014

5/5

"Great Place to stay in the heart of Rome"

Very comfortable property, spacious and within a couple of minutes of a Metro station, so it's easy to get everywhere. Well priced and a nice Welcome pack on arrival, and the vendor also purchased weekly Metro tickets for us in advance and arranged for a taxi collection to and from the airport. There's also a computer to use plus free Wi-Fi. The only downside was the proximity to a noisy road, and the sound proofing could have been better, but we lived like the locals for a week and it was perfectly bearable. Highly recommended.

21 Apr 2014

5/5

"perfect"

Maurizio is an excellent host, he has welcomed us when we arrived and gave us a lot of tips to have a good stay in rome (where to find the best pizzas, how much to pay for it, where to take the bus, h… More

Review 1-3 of 3

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Sleeps 4

    from £65 /night help

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      You're booking with

      Maurizio B.

      80% Response rate

      Calendar last updated:22 Apr 2015

      Based in Italy

      Languages spoken
      • English
      • Italian

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