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S.Maria della scala

Apartment | 1 bedrooms | sleeps 2

Key Info
  • Nearest beach 25 km
  • Not suitable for children
  • Car not necessary
  • Air conditioning
  • No pets allowed

The apartment "Trastevere" is an apartment on the second floor (no elevator) of a building mid-nineteenth century and is located in the heart of Trastevere area of Rome's most famous for its nightlife.

The apartment consists of one bedroom (king size bed) with wardrobe, bedside table and desk. The dining area is at the table for two people, there is a sofa, coffee table, a 32 "LCD TV, a DVD and a small but functional kitchenette with kettle, coffee maker ,fridge / freezer and electric stove with two plates, we also have in this room a air conditioner, and winter is also used for heating, bathroom with shower, washbasin and WC does not have a bidet.

The window of the dining room and bathroom overlooking an inner courtyard, so even having the apartment located in the most important of Rome for the night life and the way that it is the center, when our guests leave to rest are not bothered by noises and voices coming from the street.

In the area, needless to say, you can find plenty of restaurants (famous or not), pizzerias, cafes, pubs, wine bars and pubs for all tastes and all pockets, in addition every weekday in the vicinity there is a local market but there are some supermarkets and grocery stores.

The excellent location of this apartment allows you to walk all the historical sites of Rome as the most visited San Pietro and the Vatican Museums, Castel Sant'Angelo, Spanish Steps and Trevi Fountain, Piazza Navona and the Pantheon, the Capitol , the Roman Forum and Colosseum.

Remember to visit the Herbal Discalced Carmelites at the side of the entrance of Pharmacy, in St.Mary Scala Place

Size Sleeps up to 2, 1 bedrooms
Nearest beach ostia 25 km
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car not necessary
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Fiumicino 40 km, Nearest railway: Termini Station 3 km
Notes No pets allowed, Yes, smoking allowed

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player
General Air conditioning, TV, CD player, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Hair dryer
Utilities Cooker, Fridge, Freezer
Rooms 1 bedroom, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture Dining seats for 2
Other Linen provided, Towels provided

The Lazio region

Trastevere is a rione XIII of Rome, on the west bank of the Tiber, south of Vatican City. Its name comes from the Latin trans Tiberim, meaning literally "beyond the Tiber". The correct pronunciation is [tras?te?vere], with the accent on the second syllable. Its logo is a golden head of a lion on a red background, the meaning of which is uncertain. To the north, Trastevere borders on to the XIV rione, Borgo.

Rome

In Rome's Regal period (753-509 BC), the area across the Tiber belonged to the hostile Etruscans: the Romans named it Ripa Etrusca (Etruscan bank). Rome conquered it to gain control of and access to the river from both banks, but was not interested in building on that side of the river. In fact, the only connection between Trastevere and the rest of the city was a small wooden bridge called the Pons Sublicius (Latin: "bridge built on wooden piles").

By the time of the Republic c. 509 BC, the number of sailors and fishermen making a living from the river had increased, and many had taken up residence in Trastevere. Immigrants from the East also settled there, mainly Jews and Syrians. The area began to be considered part of the city under Augustus, who divided Rome into 14 regions (regiones in Latin); modern Trastevere was the XIV and was called Trans Tiberim.

Since the end of the Roman Republic the quarter was also the center of an important Jewish community,[1] which inhabited there until the end of the Middle Ages.

With the wealth of the Imperial Age, several important figures decided to build their villae in Trastevere, including Clodia, (Catullus' "friend") and Julius Caesar (his garden villa, the Horti Caesaris). The regio included two of the most ancient churches in Rome, the Titulus Callixti, later called the Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere, and the Titulus Cecilae, Santa Cecilia in Trastevere.

In order to have a stronghold on the right Bank and to control the Gianicolo hill, Transtiberim was partially included by Emperor Aurelian (270–275) inside the wall erected to defend the city against the Germanic tribes.

In the Middle Ages Trastevere had narrow, winding, irregular streets; moreover, because of the mignani (structures on the front of buildings) there was no space for carriages to pass. At the end of the 15th century these mignani were removed. Nevertheless, Trastevere remained a maze of narrow streets. There was a strong contrast between the large, opulent houses of the upper classes and the small, dilapidated houses of the poor. The streets had no pavement until the time of Sixtus IV at the end of the 15th century. At first bricks were used, but these were later replaced by sampietrini (cobble stones), which were more suitable for carriages. Thanks to its partial isolation (it was "beyond the Tiber") and to the fact that its population had been multicultural since the ancient Roman period, the inhabitants of Trastevere, called Trasteverini, developed a culture of their own. In 1744 Benedict XIV modified the borders of the rioni, giving Trastevere its modern limits.

Modern day

Nowadays, Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by medieval houses. At night, natives and tourists alike flock to its many pubs and restaurants, but much of the original character of Trastevere remains. The area is also home to several foreign academic institutions including The American University of Rome and John Cabot University (both of which are private American universities), the American Academy in Rome, the Rome campus of the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, the Canadian University of Waterloo School of Architecture (between the months of September and December), and the American Pratt Institute School of Architecture therefore serving as home to an international student body.

The unique character of this neighborhood has attracted artists, foreign expats, and many famous people. In the sixties and seventies, the American musicians/composers Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of the group Musica Elettronica Viva, lived in Via della Luce. Sergio Leone, the director of Spaghetti Westerns, grew up in Viale Glorioso (there is a marble plaque to his memory on the wall of the apartment building), and went to a Catholic private school in the neighborhood. Ennio Morricone, the film music composer, went to the same school, and for one year was in the same class as Sergio Leone.

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Review 1-4 of 4

22 Jun 2014

4/5

"great little place to stay"

We stayed here when visiting Rome last year, great little flat, near l8ts of restaurants and bars and just 5 to 10 minutes walk from some of Rome s famous and amazing places to visit. The flat is … More

22 Jun 2014

5/5

"appartement agréable et bien situé pour visiter le jour et sortir le soir"

Situation géographique idéale pour profiter de l'ambiance de Rome le soir, le trastevere est parcouru par les étudiants ou simples romains voulant prendre un verre, manger et profiter de cette… More

21 Jun 2014

3/5

"Great Location"

Stayed for 3 nights for our wedding anniversary. Our first impression of the apartment was that it was very traditional but after staying for a night we realised if was very basic but having said that… More

8 May 2014

5/5

"For our puroses the best in 15 Rome trips"

We have been in Rome about 15 times during the past 20 years. This was absolutely the best in terms of location, price, and perfectly sufficient for us in terms of luxury needs.Situated in the heart o… More

Review 1-4 of 4

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Maurizio B.

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Calendar last updated:19 Aug 2014

Based in Italy

Languages spoken
  • English
  • Italian

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