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Trastevere Apartment

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Excellent 5/5 Score from 5 reviews

Bedroom

Condo | 1 bedrooms | sleeps 2

Key Info
  • Not suitable for children
  • Car not necessary
  • Air conditioning
  • No pets allowed

The apartment "Trastevere" is an apartment on the second floor (no elevator) of a building mid-nineteenth century and is located in the heart of Trastevere area of Rome's most famous for its nightlife.

The window of the dining room and bathroom overlooking an inner courtyard, so even having the apartment located in the most important of Rome for the night life and the way that it is the center, when our guests leave to rest are not bothered by noises and voices coming from the street.

In the area, needless to say, you can find plenty of restaurants (famous or not), pizzerias, cafes, pubs, wine bars and pubs for all tastes and all pockets, in addition every weekday in the vicinity there is a local market but there are some supermarkets and grocery stores.

The excellent location of this apartment allows you to walk all the historical sites of Rome as the most visited San Pietro and the Vatican Museums, Castel Sant'Angelo, Spanish Steps and Trevi Fountain, Piazza Navona and the Pantheon, the Capitol , the Roman Forum and Colosseum.

Size Sleeps up to 2, 1 bedrooms
Will consider Corporate bookings, Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car not necessary
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Fiumicino 35 km, Nearest railway: Termini 5 km
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player
General Air conditioning, TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Hair dryer
Utilities Fridge, Freezer
Rooms 1 bedroom, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture Double beds (1), Dining seats for 2, Lounge seats for 2
Other Linen provided, Towels provided

The Lazio region

The Italian word Lazio descends from the Latin word Latium. The name of the region also survives in the tribal designation of the ancient population of Latins, Latini in the Latin language spoken by them and passed on to the city-state of Ancient Rome. Although the demography of ancient Rome was multi-ethnic, including, for example, Etruscans and other Italics besides the Latini, the latter were the dominant constituent. In Roman mythology, the tribe of the Latini took their name from king Latinus. Apart from the mythical derivation of Lazio given by the ancients as the place where Jupiter "lay hidden" from his father seeking to kill him, a major modern etymology is that Lazio comes from the Latin word "latus", meaning "wide", expressing the idea of "flat land" meaning the Roman Campagna. Much of Lazio is in fact flat or rolling. The lands originally inhabited by the Latini were extended into the territories of the Samnites, the Marsi, the Hernici, the Aequi, the Aurunci and the Volsci, all surrounding Italic tribes. This larger territory was still called Latium, but it was divided into Latium adiectum or Latium Novum, the added lands or New Latium, and Latium Vetus, or Old Latium, the older, smaller region.

The northern border of Lazio was the Tiber river, which divided it from Etruria.

The emperor Augustus officially united almost all of present-day Italy into a single geo-political entity, Italia, dividing it into eleven regions. Lazio – together with the present region of Campania immediately to the southeast of Lazio and the seat of Neapolis – became Region I.

After the Gothic War (535-554) and the Byzantine conquest, this region regained its freedom, because the "Roman Duchy" became the property of the Eastern Emperor. However, the long wars against the barbarian Longobards weakened the region, which was seized by the Roman Bishop who already had several properties in those territories.

The strengthening of the religious and ecclesiastical aristocracy led to continuous power struggles between lords and the Roman bishop until the middle of the 16th century. Innocent III tried to strengthen his own territorial power, wishing to assert his authority in the provincial administrations of Tuscia, Campagna and Marittima through the Church's representatives, in order to reduce the power of the Colonna family. Other popes tried to do the same. During the period when the papacy resided in Avignon, France (1309–1377), the feudal lords' power increased due to the absence of the Pope from Rome. Small communes, and Rome above all, opposed the lords' increasing power, and with Cola di Rienzo, they tried to present themselves as antagonists of the ecclesiastical power. However, between 1353 and 1367, the papacy regained control of Lazio and the rest of the Papal States.

From the middle of the 16th century, the papacy politically unified Lazio with the Papal States[citation needed], so that these territories became provincial administrations of St. Peter's estate; governors in Viterbo, in Marittima and Campagna, and in Frosinone administered them for the papacy.

Lazio comprised the short-lived Roman Republic, in which it became a puppet state of the First French Republic under the forces of Napoleon Bonaparte. The Republic existed from 15 February 1798 until Lazio was returned to the Papal States in October 1799. In 1809, Lazio was annexed to the French Empire, but returned under the Pope in 1815.

On 20 September 1870 the capture of Rome, during the reign of Pope Pius IX, and France's defeat at Sedan, completed Italian unification, and Lazio was incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy.

Rome

Trastevere is the 13th rione of Rome, on the west bank of the Tiber, south of Vatican City. Its name comes from the Latin trans Tiberim, meaning literally "beyond the Tiber". The correct pronunciation is [tras?te?vere], with the accent on the second syllable. Its logo is a golden head of a lion on a red background, the meaning of which is uncertain. To the north, Trastevere borders on to the XIV rione, Borgo.

In Rome's Regal period (753-509 BC), the area across the Tiber belonged to the hostile Etruscans: the Romans named it Ripa Etrusca (Etruscan bank). Rome conquered it to gain control of and access to the river from both banks, but was not interested in building on that side of the river. In fact, the only connection between Trastevere and the rest of the city was a small wooden bridge called the Pons Sublicius (Latin: "bridge built on wooden piles").

By the time of the Republic c. 509 BC, the number of sailors and fishermen making a living from the river had increased, and many had taken up residence in Trastevere. Immigrants from the East also settled there, mainly Jews and Syrians. The area began to be considered part of the city under Augustus, who divided Rome into 14 regions (regiones in Latin); modern Trastevere was the XIV and was called Trans Tiberim.

Since the end of the Roman Republic the quarter was also the center of an important Jewish community,[1] which inhabited there until the end of the Middle Ages.

With the wealth of the Imperial Age, several important figures decided to build their villae in Trastevere, including Clodia, (Catullus' "friend") and Julius Caesar (his garden villa, the Horti Caesaris). The regio included two of the most ancient churches in Rome, the Titulus Callixti, later called the Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere, and the Titulus Cecilae, Santa Cecilia in Trastevere.

In order to have a stronghold on the right Bank and to control the Gianicolo hill, Transtiberim was partially included by Emperor Aurelian (270–275) inside the wall erected to defend the city against the Germanic tribes.

In the Middle Ages Trastevere had narrow, winding, irregular streets; moreover, because of the mignani (structures on the front of buildings) there was no space for carriages to pass. At the end of the 15th century these mignani were removed. Nevertheless, Trastevere remained a maze of narrow streets. There was a strong contrast between the large, opulent houses of the upper classes and the small, dilapidated houses of the poor. The streets had no pavement until the time of Sixtus IV at the end of the 15th century. At first bricks were used, but these were later replaced by sampietrini (cobble stones), which were more suitable for carriages. Thanks to its partial isolation (it was "beyond the Tiber") and to the fact that its population had been multicultural since the ancient Roman period, the inhabitants of Trastevere, called Trasteverini, developed a culture of their own. In 1744 Benedict XIV modified the borders of the rioni, giving Trastevere its modern limits.

Nowadays, Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by medieval houses. At night, natives and tourists alike flock to its many pubs and restaurants, but much of the original character of Trastevere remains. The area is also home to several foreign academic institutions including The American University of Rome and John Cabot University (both of which are private American universities), the American Academy in Rome, the Rome campus of the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, the Canadian University of Waterloo School of Architecture (between the months of September and December), and the American Pratt Institute School of Architecture therefore serving as home to an international student body.

The unique character of this neighborhood has attracted artists, foreign expats, and many famous people. In the sixties and seventies, the American musicians/composers Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of the group Musica Elettronica Viva, lived in Via della Luce. Sergio Leone, the director of Spaghetti Westerns, grew up in Viale Glorioso (there is a marble plaque to his memory on the wall of the apartment building), and went to a Catholic private school in the neighborhood. Ennio Morricone, the film music composer, went to the same school, and for one year was in the same class as Sergio Leone.

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Review 1-5 of 5

1 Oct 2014

4/5

"Cosy apartment, great location."

Nice cosy apartment 10 minutes' walk from the river, and 15 minutes from the centre of town and sites. Maurizio and his wife were very welcoming and provided us with everything we needed, includi… More

20 Jul 2014

4/5

"Lovely little apartment in the heart of Trastevere."

We spent five nights in this apartment and thoroughly enjoyed it. Basic cooking facilities allowed us to prepare a few meals which was welcome. Having said this, the apartment was in the heart of Trastevere so eating options were not a problem.
No WIFI but Maurizio advises this will change next month and plenty of cafés offering it nearby.

20 Jul 2014

5/5

"Great location, clean, modern and perfect for our visit to Rome."

Mr Bolognasi provided excellent service and a useful and polite welcome to the apartment. The apartment itself was a perfect size and excellent location for visiting the main attractions of Rome. The apartment was exceptionally clean and many thanks to Mrs Bolognasi for supplying towels and other items for our use. I would and already have strongly recommended Vatican Apartments to friends and family.

10 Jun 2014

5/5

"Perfect accomodation"

This apartment was a perfect choice. It offers all you need for a city break: perfect location, cozy atmosphere, very clean, well - equipped and Maurizio was perfect host who pleased us with warm welcoming and plenty of very useful tips.

All mayor sites are in walkable distance and it also offers easy escape for bikers. (We enjoyed most our cycling day trip around Rome; although, I would recommend it only to skilled bikers as Rome does not have very well developed cycling routes and Italians are crazy drivers :).

In addition, Trastevere is very magical place. Although only 10 minutes away from Plaza Navonna, it takes you away from the tourist crowds where you can enjoy life with locals.

8 Jun 2014

5/5

"The perfect location for exploring Rome."

We stayed in this delightful apartment for 5 nights in the middle of May. It proved the perfect location for exploring the sights of Rome on foot and we were glad we hadn't bought the weekly transport pass as the only time we used public transport was to get to and from Fiumicino Airport ( a travel hint for those arriving at Fiumicino, we used the regional train to Trastevere Station and then, having bought our tram tickets from the tobacconist on the right as you come out of the station, caught the number 8 tram for six stops to Belli stop just before the River Tiber- from there it was only a 5 minute walk to the apartment. This proved cheaper and avoided the busy Termini station). The apartment is on the second floor of the bustling and atmospheric area of Trastevere. Other reviewers have noted the contrast between the noisy and vibrant street life and the peace and quiet of the apartment which is as the back of the building. We can only agree and slept extremely well during our stay thanks both to this and the very comfortable king size bed. We were able to prepare relatively straightforward meals in the small but perfectly adequate kitchen, in part using the foodstuffs generously provided by Maurizio and his wife who welcomed us warmly on arrival. All in all, for good value accommodation in the heart of this fascinating city we would heartily recommend Trastevere Apartment, something we have already done to family and friends!

Review 1-5 of 5

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Maurizio B.

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Calendar last updated:01 Oct 2014

Based in Italy

Languages spoken
  • English
  • Italian

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