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Fontana di Trevi Apartment

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Apartment | 1 bedrooms | sleeps 4

Key Info
  • Nearest beach 20 km
  • Great for children of all ages 5
  • Car advised
  • Air conditioning
  • No pets allowed

Lovely apartment on the corner of the world famous Fontana di Trevi square reachable by walk in a few seconds. The apartament can host a maximum of four persons, is composed of one bedroom with doublebed and 1 private bathroom with bath and a large living room with a sofa where you can relax watching the TV, and at nigth can be convert in a confortable doublebed.The type of heating is placed under the floor of the entire house except the bathroom which hasits own.On the corner of the living room there is a nice kitchnette fully equipped. In every room there is air conditioning and wifi connection. It is the perfect holiday getaway for families and couples alike.

Size Sleeps up to 4, 1 bedrooms
Nearest beach Fregene - Ostia 20 km
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 1 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Fiumicino 32 km, Nearest railway: Termini Station 1 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes No pets allowed, Yes, smoking allowed

Features and Facilities

General Central heating, Air conditioning, TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster
Utilities Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer
Rooms 1 bedroom, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture 1 Sofa beds, Double beds (1), Dining seats for 1
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair

The Lazio region

The Italian word Lazio descends from the Latin word Latium. The name of the region also survives in the tribal designation of the ancient population of Latins, Latini in the Latin language spoken by them and passed on to the city-state of Ancient Rome. Although the demography of ancient Rome was multi-ethnic, including, for example, Etruscans and other Italics besides the Latini, the latter were the dominant constituent. In Roman mythology, the tribe of the Latini took their name from king Latinus. Apart from the mythical derivation of Lazio given by the ancients as the place where Jupiter "lay hidden" from his father seeking to kill him, a major modern etymology is that Lazio comes from the Latin word "latus", meaning "wide", expressing the idea of "flat land" meaning the Roman Campagna. Much of Lazio is in fact flat or rolling. The lands originally inhabited by the Latini were extended into the territories of the Samnites, the Marsi, the Hernici, the Aequi, the Aurunci and the Volsci, all surrounding Italic tribes. This larger territory was still called Latium, but it was divided into Latium adiectum or Latium Novum, the added lands or New Latium, and Latium Vetus, or Old Latium, the older, smaller region.

The northern border of Lazio was the Tiber river, which divided it from Etruria.

The emperor Augustus officially united almost all of present-day Italy into a single geo-political entity, Italia, dividing it into eleven regions. Lazio – together with the present region of Campania immediately to the southeast of Lazio and the seat of Neapolis – became Region I.

After the Gothic War (535-554) and the Byzantine conquest, this region regained its freedom, because the "Roman Duchy" became the property of the Eastern Emperor. However, the long wars against the barbarian Longobards weakened the region, which was seized by the Roman Bishop who already had several properties in those territories.

The strengthening of the religious and ecclesiastical aristocracy led to continuous power struggles between lords and the Roman bishop until the middle of the 16th century. Innocent III tried to strengthen his own territorial power, wishing to assert his authority in the provincial administrations of Tuscia, Campagna and Marittima through the Church's representatives, in order to reduce the power of the Colonna family. Other popes tried to do the same. During the period when the papacy resided in Avignon, France (1309–1377), the feudal lords' power increased due to the absence of the Pope from Rome. Small communes, and Rome above all, opposed the lords' increasing power, and with Cola di Rienzo, they tried to present themselves as antagonists of the ecclesiastical power. However, between 1353 and 1367, the papacy regained control of Lazio and the rest of the Papal States.

From the middle of the 16th century, the papacy politically unified Lazio with the Papal States[citation needed], so that these territories became provincial administrations of St. Peter's estate; governors in Viterbo, in Marittima and Campagna, and in Frosinone administered them for the papacy.

Lazio comprised the short-lived Roman Republic, in which it became a puppet state of the First French Republic under the forces of Napoleon Bonaparte. The Republic existed from 15 February 1798 until Lazio was returned to the Papal States in October 1799. In 1809, Lazio was annexed to the French Empire, but returned under the Pope in 1815.

On 20 September 1870 the capture of Rome, during the reign of Pope Pius IX, and France's defeat at Sedan, completed Italian unification, and Lazio was incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy.

Economy[edit]

Rome

Rome is the capital of Italy and the country's largest and most populated city and comune, with over 2.7 million residents in 1,285.3 km2 (496.3 sq mi). Rome's metropolitan area is also the largest in Italy with some 4.2 million residents of Province of Rome.[2] The city is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, on the Tiber River within the Lazio region of Italy.

Rome's history spans over two and a half thousand years. It was the capital city of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, which was the dominant power in Western Europe and the lands bordering the Mediterranean Sea for over seven hundred years from the 1st century BC until the 7th century AD. Since the 1st century AD Rome has been the seat of the Papacy and, after the end of Byzantine domination, in the 8th century it became the capital of the Papal States, which lasted until 1870. In 1871 Rome became the capital of the Kingdom of Italy, and in 1946 that of the Italian Republic.

After the Middle-Ages, Rome was ruled by popes such as Alexander VI and Leo X, who transformed the city into one of the major centers of the Italian Renaissance, along with Florence.[3] The current-day version of St Peter's Basilica was built and the Sistine Chapel was painted by Michelangelo. Famous artists and architects, such as Bramante, Bernini and Raphael resided for some time in Rome, contributing to its Renaissance and Baroque architecture.

In 2007 Rome was the 11th-most-visited city in the world, 3rd most visited in the European Union, and the most popular tourist attraction in Italy.[4] The city is one of Europe's and the world's most successful city brands, both in terms of reputation and assets.[5] Its historic centre is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.[6] Monuments and museums such as the Vatican Museums and the Colosseum are amongst the world's 50 most visited tourist destinations (the Vatican Museums receiving 4.2 million tourists and the Colosseum receiving 4 million tourists every year)

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2 Nights min stay

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Francesca M.

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Calendar last updated:21 Aug 2014

Based in

Languages spoken
  • English
  • French
  • Italian

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