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small cozy kitchen

Cottage | 2 bedrooms | sleeps 4

Key Info
  • Nearest beach 1 km
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car essential
  • Pets welcome
  • Private garden

A small cottage house near the port of Rafina(second largest port of Attica).The area is called '' kokkino limanaki''-RED PORT.

The house is located in a small hill overlooking the sea .Beach distance only 6-8 minutes walk, or 2-3 minutes by car.

It is furnished, and is ideal for a family with 2 kids. It can be either rented for the whole year, or for the summer months or for 2-3 weeks for relaxed summer vacations.

In 10 -15 minutes one can be at the port and easily have either a daily cruise , or be able to visit the islands of Cyclades (Mykonos, Andros..etc).

Kokkino Limanaki is near Marathon ,where one can have an excusrion in the area of the famous Marathon battle....

MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE BEACH OF KOKKINO LIMANAKI-(RED PORT)

Two kilometres from the Port of Rafina is Kokkino Limanaki. Though not technically an organised beach, it has a lifeguard stationed for safety.

Because of easy access, Kokkino Limanaki is one of the busiest beaches in the area.

Size Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
Nearest beach KOKKINO LIMANAKI (RED PORT) 1 km
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car essential, Wheelchair users
Nearest Amenities 1 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: ATHENS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EL.VENIZELOS 30 km, Nearest railway: SUBURBAN TRAIN OR UNDERGROUND TRAIN 15 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes Pets welcome, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Log fire, DVD player, Sea view
General TV, Telephone
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron
Utilities Cooker, Microwave, Fridge
Rooms 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms of which 2 Shower rooms
Furniture Single beds (2), Double beds (1), Dining seats for 6, Lounge seats for 4
Other Linen provided, Towels provided
Outdoors Balcony or terrace, Private garden, BBQ
Access Parking, Wheelchair users

The Attica region

Attica (Greek: ??????, Attikí; IPA: [ati?ci]) is an administrative region in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. This region covers a greater area than the historical region of Attica.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

www.cityofathens.gr

Athens (/?æ??nz/;[2] Modern Greek: ?????, Athína; IPA: [a??ina]; Katharevousa: ??????, Athinai; Ancient Greek: ??????, Ath?nai) is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning around 3,400 years. Classical Athens was a powerful city-state. A centre for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum,[3][4] it is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy,[5][6] largely due to the impact of its cultural and political achievements during the 5th and 4th centuries BC in later centuries on the rest of the then known European continent.[7] Today a cosmopolitan metropolis, modern Athens is central to economic, financial, industrial, political and cultural life in Greece. In 2008, Athens was ranked the world's 32nd richest city by purchasing power[8] and the 25th most expensive[9] in a UBS study.

The city of Athens has a population of 664,046[1] (796,442 back in 2004)[10] within its administrative limits and a land area of 39 km2 (15 sq mi).[11] The urban area of Athens (Greater Athens and Greater Piraeus) extends beyond the administrative municipal city limits, with a population of 3,074,160 (in 2011),[12] over an area of 412 km2 (159 sq mi).[11] According to Eurostat, the Athens Larger Urban Zone (LUZ) is the 7th most populous LUZ in the European Union (the 4th most populous capital city of the EU) with a population of 4,013,368 (in 2004). Athens is also the southernmost capital on the European mainland.

The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all being the Parthenon, considered a key landmark of early Western civilization. The city also retains Roman and Byzantine monuments, as well as a smaller number of Ottoman monuments. The Greek influence of the city is greatly noted through the stellar artwork of the Greek workers of the city of the city-state of Athens.

Athens is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Acropolis of Athens and the medieval Daphni Monastery. Landmarks of the modern era, dating back to the establishment of Athens as the capital of the independent Greek state in 1834, include the Hellenic Parliament (19th century) and the Athens Trilogy consisting of the National Library of Greece, the Athens University and the Academy of Athens. Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics.[13] Athens is home to the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world's largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, as well as the new Acropolis Museum.

Rafina

Rafina (Greek: ??????) is a town located on the eastern coast of Attica in Greece. It has a population of 10,701 inhabitants (2001 census). Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Rafina-Pikermi, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2]Rafina lies east of the Penteli mountains and northeast of the Mesogeia plain with an area of farmland near the coastline to the north. The Cephissus River lies to the west. It is located E of Athens and the Attiki Odos (number 63), S of Nea Makri, NNE of the Eleftherios Venizelos Airport and N of Loutsa. Rafina is about 30 km E of downtown Athens.

The municipal unit of Rafina contains, besides the city itself, a large portion of the surrounding area, which is mostly woodland and farmland. The only other town is Kallitechnoúpoli (pop. 557).

[edit]Road and sea access

The town can be accessed through Marathonos Avenue (GR-54) to the west. Other roads link with the town of Artemida, also known as Loutsa, to the south and Nea Makri to the North.

Rafina is a port town serving ferries to the southern part of Euboea as well as most of the Cyclades. Its port is the second largest of Attica, after that of Piraeus, but it will probably be superseded by the one in Lavrio, which is currently being expanded.

[edit]History

Rafina was established in the 1920s by refugees fleeing from Anatolia after the end of the Greco-Turkish War (1919–1922) on the site of a small Arvanite village. Most of these refugees originated from the town of Triglia. Its name is an anagram of the name of an ancient Greek city which was located roughly in the same location as the modern town. Until the 1960s and the 1970s, most of the population was rural. As housing developments came to the area, the population boomed and moved into the settlements.

The beautiful small church of Agios Nicolas overlooks the blue sea just North of the town. The chapel was built after World War II by men who were to be executed but spared at the last minute. The town commandant had been assassinated and the Germans rounded up townspeople in retaliation. Another group of men were executed and those at the present site of Agios Nicolas were spared.

THE MARATHON REGION IS NEAR AND WORHTWHILE VISITING: below is info concerning the legend of the messenger ............

The name Marathon comes from the legend of Pheidippides, a Greek messenger. The legend states that he was sent from the battlefield of Marathon to Athens to announce that the Persians had been defeated in the Battle of Marathon (in which he had just fought),[4] which took place in August or September, 490 BC.[5] It is said that he ran the entire distance without stopping and burst into the assembly, exclaiming "???????????' (nenikekamen)", ("We w?n"), before collapsing and dying.[6] The account of the run from Marathon to Athens first appears in Plutarch's On the Glory of Athens in the 1st century AD which quotes from Heraclides Ponticus's lost work, giving the runner's name as either Thersipus of Erchius or Eucles.[7] Lucian of Samosata (2nd century AD) also gives the story but names the runner Philippides (not Pheidippides).[8]

There is debate about the historical accuracy of this legend.[9][10] The Greek historian Herodotus, the main source for the Greco-Persian Wars, mentions Pheidippides as the messenger who ran from Athens to Sparta asking for help, and then ran back, a distance of over 240 kilometres (150 mi) each way.[11] In some Herodotus manuscripts the name of the runner between Athens and Sparta is given as Philippides. Herodotus makes no mention of a messenger sent from Marathon to Athens, and relates that the main part of the Athenian army, having fought and won the grueling battle, and fearing a naval raid by the Persian fleet against an undefended Athens, marched quickly back from the battle to Athens, arriving the same day.

In 1879, Robert Browning wrote the poem Pheidippides. Browning's poem, his composite story, became part of late 19th century popular culture and was accepted as a historic legend.[citation needed]

Mount Penteli stands between Marathon and Athens, which means that, if Pheidippides actually made his famous run after the battle, he had to run around the mountain, either to the north or to the south. The latter and more obvious route matches almost exactly the modern Marathon-Athens highway, which follows the lie of the land southwards from Marathon Bay and along the coast, then takes a gentle but protracted climb westwards towards the eastern approach to Athens, between the foothills of Mounts Hymettus and Penteli, and then gently downhill to Athens proper. This route, as it existed when the Olympics were revived in 1896, was approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) long, and this was the approximate distance originally used for marathon races. However there have been suggestions that Pheidippides might have followed another route: a westward climb along the eastern and northern slopes of Mount Penteli to the pass of Dionysos, and then a straight southward downhill path to Athens. This route is considerably shorter, some 35 kilometres (22 mi), but includes a very steep initial climb of more than 5 kilometres (3.1 mi).

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3 Nights min stay

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ANASTASIA K.

79% Response rate

Calendar last updated:05 Aug 2014

Based in Greece

Languages spoken
  • English