List your home
Apply filters
£ to

Simonella

from£51/nighthelp

other travellers have booked this property
other travellers have booked this property online using Holiday Lettings Payments. When you book your rental using Holiday Lettings payments you are covered by Payment Protection

Bedroom

Apartment | 2 bedrooms | sleeps 4

Key Info
  • Suitable for children over
  • Car not necessary
  • Some pets are welcome - please contact the owner

Romantic and bright apartment located on the 3rd floor of an old house in the historic center of Lucca. The property is easily accessible by car (free parking spaces nearby - area football stadium). The apartment is in the attic and is composed of: living room with sofa and dining table, kitchen with stove / oven and fridge / freezer, 1 double bedroom, 1 bedroom with 2 single beds, bedroom loft with spiral staircase used as a laundry / ironing room, bathroom with shower and toilet / bidet.

From the windows you can enjoy a special view on the historical Via dei Fossi and the roofs of Lucca. The apartment is located close to the famous walls on which you can make relaxing walks on foot or by bicycle (bike rental nearby. Easily accessible by car (free parking spaces nearby - area football stadium). The apartment is bright and enjoys a view over the rooftops of the city.

Size Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car not necessary
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Pisa 20 km, Nearest railway: Lucca 1 km
Family friendly Suitable for children over 5
Notes Pets welcome, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

General Central heating, TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Toaster, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Cooker, Fridge, Washing machine
Rooms 2 bedrooms, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Shower rooms
Furniture Single beds (2), Double beds (1), Dining seats for 4
Other Linen provided, Towels provided

The Tuscany region

Tuscany is known for its landscapes, traditions, history, artistic legacy and its permanent influence on high culture. It is regarded as the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance and has been home to many figures influential in the history of art and science, such as Petrarch, Dante, Boccaccio, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Niccolò Macchiavelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei, Amerigo Vespucci, Luca Pacioli, Amedeo Modigliani and Giacomo Puccini. As a result, the region boasts museums (such as the Uffizi, the Pitti Palace and the Chianciano Museum of Art). Tuscany is famous for its wines, including the well-known Chianti, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Morellino di Scansano and Brunello di Montalcino.

The Lucchese School, also known as the School of Lucca and as the Pisan-Lucchese School, was a school of painting and sculpture that flourished in the 11th and 12th centuries in the western and southern part of the region, with an important center in Volterra. The art is mostly anonymous. Although not as elegant or delicate as the Florentine School, Lucchese works are remarkable for their monumental.

Lucca

Lucca is a city and comune in Tuscany, Central Italy, situated on the river Serchio in a fertile plain near the Tyrrhenian Sea. It is the capital city of the Province of Lucca. Among other reasons, it is famous for its intact Renaissance-era city walls.

Lucca was founded by the Etruscans (there are traces of a pre-existing Ligurian settlement) and became a Roman colony in 180 BC. The rectangular grid of its historical centre preserves the Roman street plan, and the Piazza San Michele occupies the site of the ancient forum. Traces of the amphitheatre can still be seen in the Piazza dell'Anfiteatro. At the Lucca Conference, in 56 BC, Julius Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus reaffirmed their political alliance known as the First Triumvirate.

Frediano, an Irish monk, was bishop of Lucca in the early 6th century. At one point, Lucca was plundered by Odoacer, the first Germanic King of Italy. Lucca was an important city and fortress even in the 6th century, when Narses besieged it for several months in 553. Under the Lombards, it was the seat of a duke who minted his own coins. The Holy Face of Lucca (or Volto Santo), a major relic supposedly carved by Nicodemus, arrived in 742. During the 8th - 10th centuries it was a center of Jewish life, led by the Kalonymos family (who at some point during this period migrated to Germany and became a major component of proto-Ashkenazic Jewry). It became prosperous through the silk trade that began in the 11th century, and came to rival the silks of Byzantium. During the 10–11th centuries Lucca was the capital of the feudal margraviate of Tuscany, more or less independent but owing nominal allegiance to the Holy Roman Emperor.

After the death of Matilda of Tuscany, the city began to constitute itself an independent commune, with a charter in 1160. For almost 500 years, Lucca remained an independent republic. There were many minor provinces in the region between southern Liguria and northern Tuscany dominated by the Malaspina; Tuscany in this time was a part of feudal Europe. Dante's Divine Comedy includes many references to the great feudal families who had huge jurisdictions with administrative and judicial rights. Dante spent some of his exile in Lucca.

In 1273 and again in 1277, Lucca was ruled by a Guelph capitano del popolo (captain of the people) named Luchetto Gattilusio. In 1314, internal discord allowed Uguccione della Faggiuola of Pisa to make himself lord of Lucca. The Lucchesi expelled him two years later, and handed over the city to another condottiere Castruccio Castracani, under whose rule it became a leading state in central Italy. Lucca rivalled Florence until Castracani's death in 1328. On 22 and 23 September 1325, in the battle of Altopascio, Castracani defeated Florence's Guelphs. For this he was nominated by Louis IV the Bavarian to become duke of Lucca. Castracani's tomb is in the church of San Francesco. His biography is Machiavelli's third famous book on political rule. In 1408, Lucca hosted the convocation intended to end the schism in the papacy. Occupied by the troops of Louis of Bavaria, the city was sold to a rich Genoese, Gherardino Spinola, then seized by John, king of Bohemia. Pawned to the Rossi of Parma, by them it was ceded to Martino della Scala of Verona, sold to the Florentines, surrendered to the Pisans, and then nominally liberated by the emperor Charles IV and governed by his vicar. Lucca managed, at first as a democracy, and after 1628 as an oligarchy, to maintain its independence alongside of Venice and Genoa, and painted the word Libertas on its banner until the French Revolution in 1789.

Lucca had been the second largest Italian city state (after Venice) with a republican constitution ("comune") to remain independent over the centuries. In 1805, Lucca was conquered by Napoleon, who installed his sister Elisa Bonaparte Baciocchi as "Queen of Etruria". After 1815 it became a Bourbon-Parma duchy, then part of Tuscany in 1847 and finally part of the Italian State.

This advert is created and maintained by the advertiser; we can only publish adverts in good faith as we don't own, manage or inspect any of the properties. We advise you to familiarise yourself with our terms of use.

Close

3 Nights min stay

Changeover day Flexible

from£51/nighthelp

This is the estimated nightly price based on a weekly stay. Contact the advertiser to confirm the price - it varies depending on when you stay and how long for.

Book your stay

*
*
*

Subtotal

 Your dates are available

Contact the owner

Close

Payment options

You need to pay through the Holiday Lettings website to ensure your payment is protected. We can’t protect your payment if you don’t pay through us.Learn more

You're booking with

Pietro G.

85% Response rate

Calendar last updated:14 Jul 2014

Based in Italy

Languages spoken
  • English
  • French
  • Italian

Also consider

Lucca
578 properties
Capannori
125 properties
Pescia
74 properties
Massarosa
52 properties
Montecarlo
36 properties
Pescaglia
25 properties
Borgo a Mozzano
21 properties
Ponte a Moriano
19 properties
Castagnori
19 properties
Stiava
18 properties
Calci
17 properties
Buti
13 properties
Altopascio
13 properties
Colline Lucchesi
11 properties
San Ginese di Compito
9 properties
San Leonardo in Treponzio
9 properties
San Gennaro
9 properties
Sant'Andrea di Compito
7 properties
Vecchiano
7 properties
Colle di Compito
6 properties

Start a new search