Apartment | 1 bedrooms | sleeps 3

Key Info
  • Beach or lakeside relaxation
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Air conditioning
  • Pets welcome
  • Car not necessary
  • Nearest beach 0km

House Manfredi is a beautiful penthouse apartment just 20 m from the castle of King Manfred, founder of the city of Manfredonia.

Useful for holidays or for business trips, even for short periods located in the center.

The apartment is composed as follows:

master bedroom with bathroom, living room with sofa double bed, kitchen and a large terrace, which overlooks the main pedestrian area, from where you can admire a wonderful sea view.

Manfredonia is the gate of Gargano, mnagnifica because it offers a microclimate, you can enjoy the pleasure of Mountain areas such as the sea, hiking in the forest and enjoy excellent cuisine of the Mediterranean, making a turn in the countryside of olive groves

For specific requests esitateci to contact and we will try to do its utmost to fulfill your needs.

For further information please contact Michael 388 6251929

Nicola 338 7478656

Size Sleeps up to 3, 1 bedrooms
Nearest beach Beach Manfredonia
Will consider Corporate bookings, House swap, Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car not necessary, Wheelchair users
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Bari 80 km, Nearest railway: Manfredonia 1 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes Pets welcome, Yes, smoking allowed

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player, Sea view
General Central heating, Air conditioning, TV, CD player, Telephone, Fax machine, Satellite TV
Standard Toaster
Utilities Clothes dryer, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 1 bedroom, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms, Solarium or roof terrace
Furniture 1 Sofa beds, Double beds (1), Dining seats for 1, Lounge seats for 1
Other High chair
Outdoors Balcony or terrace, Bicycles available
Access Parking, Wheelchair users

The Puglia/Molise region

Apulia is one of the richest archaeological regions in Italy. It was first colonized by Mycenaean Greeks.[3] At the 8th century BC, the Ancient Greeks expanded until reaching the area of Taranto and Salento in Magna Graecia. In the 5th and 4th centuries BC, the Greek settlement at Taras produced a distinctive style of pottery (Apulian vase painting).

In ancient times only the northern part of the region was called Apulia; the southern peninsula was known as Calabria, a name now used to designate the southwestern tip of the Italian peninsula (the "toe" of the Italian "boot").

Apulia was an important area for the ancient Romans, who conquered it during the course of wars against the Samnites and against Pyrrhus in the 4th and 3rd centuries BC but also suffered a crushing defeat here in the battle of Cannae against Hannibal. However, after the Carthaginians left the region, the Romans captured the ports of Brindisi and Taranto, and established dominion over the region. During the Imperial age Apulia was a flourishing area for production of grain and oil, becoming the most important exporter to the Eastern provinces.

After the fall of Rome, Apulia was held successively by the Goths, the Lombards and, from the 6th century onwards, the Byzantines. Bari became the capital of a province that extended to modern Basilicata, and was ruled by a catepano (governor), hence the name of Capitanata of the Barese neighbourhood. From 800 on, a Saracen presence was intermittent, but Apulia remained under the Byzantine authority, despite the region being mainly inhabited by Lombards until the 11th century, when the Normans conquered it with relative ease.

Robert Guiscard set up the Duchy of Apulia in 1059. After the Norman conquest of Sicily in the late 11th century, Palermo replaced Melfi (just west of present day Apulia) as the center of Norman power, and Apulia became a mere province, first of the Kingdom of Sicily, then of the Kingdom of Naples. From the late 12th to early 13th centuries, Apulia was a favorite residence of the Hohenstaufen emperors, notably Frederick II. After the fall of the latter's heir, Manfred, under the Angevine and Crown of Aragon/Spanish dominations Apulia became largely dominated by a small number of powerful landowners (Baroni). In 1734 there were the battle of Bitonto, a Spanish victory over Austrian forces. The coast was occupied at times by the Turks and by the Venetians. When Barbary pirates of North Africa sacked Vieste in 1554 they took an 7,000 slaves. The French also controlled the region in 1806–15, resulting in the abolition of feudalism and the reformation of the justice system.

In 1861 the region became part of the Kingdom of Italy.[4]

Foggia

The area of current Manfredonia was settled in ancient times by the Greeks, founded by Diomedes. The flourishing Greek colony, having fallen into the hands of the Samnites, was retaken about 335 BC by King Alexander of Epirus, uncle of Alexander the Great.

In 189 BC Sipontum was conquered by the Romans and became a colony of citizens. It was a port at the junction of the road which basically followed the Adriatic coast (but gving the Garganus mountain's peninsula just north a miss) and a road through Arpi, Luceria, Aecae and Aequum Tuticum connecting at Beneventum to the Via Appia.

In AD 663 it was taken and destroyed by the Slavs. In the 9th century, Sipontum was for a time in the power of the Saracens.

ln 1042 the Normans made it the seat of one of their twelve counties, while the Monte Gargano remained Byzantine. The Normans won a decisive victory there over the Byzantine general Argyrus in 1052. Siponto was an archbishopric in the Norman countship of Apulia.

Having become unhealthy owing to the stagnation of the water in the lagoons after the 1223 earthquake, Siponto was abandoned. The modern city of Manfredonia was built by King Manfred between 1256–1263, some kilometers north of the ruins of the ancient Sipontum. The Angevins, who had defeated Manfred and stripped him of the Kingdom of Sicily, christened it Sypontum Novellum ("New Sypontum"), but that name never imposed.

In 1528 Manfredonia resisted a French attack led by the Viscount of Lautrec. In 1620 it was destroyed by the Turks, who left only the castle and part of the walls.