Cottage | 2 bedrooms | sleeps 4

Key Info
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Some pets are welcome - please contact the owner
  • Private garden
  • Car essential

Near the city of Lucca, in the very characteristic village of Pescaglia a Beautiful Newly Restored Old Tuscan two bedrooms village house with a very tastefully landscaped garden for your total privacy.

The name Pescaglia is thought by some to derive from the Latin word 'Pascualia' meaning pastureland, and by others from the verb 'pescare' meaning to fish. Both relate to the abundant natural resources of the territory. Set In the Nationally Protected Forest of the Apuan Alps, it is the ideal place for mountain biking, walking, rock climbing, great for fishing or just chilling out. The villages around are all quiet, charming and full of character with local shops restaurants and bars.

Lucca, with its stunning walled 'old town' it's about 35 minute drive from the house and there is also a local bus service several times a day.

Lucca is an UNESCO World Heritage Centre and has a range of attractions:

Puccini museum, Lu.C.C.A one of the best contemporary art museums in Italy, the cartoon museum and many others.

Cycling around the Lucca wall is not to be missed!

We are about 45 mins from the beaches of Viareggio, Forte dei Marmi and from the city of Pietrasanta.

Bagni Di Lucca is also a short drive away - an attractive Village with restaurants, a Thermal Spa and a large public pool with diving boards set in the grounds of a Villa..

For those who love shopping the Outlet Mall and Outlet Barberino near Florence are great for Italian designer shops at affordable prices.

Also during winter months Pescaglia is a good place to stay where you can relax enjoy the area and drive to skiing resorts, about 40 minutes away.

The house is not reachable by car, the car park is app. 100 mt. away.

The whole Pescaglia Village is pedestrian. There is a big parking area at the entrance of the village near the mayor office and the red cross.

And a smaller parking on the back side of the village.

Both parkings are approx 100mt from the Casa Rossa entrance.

The house has a Private Garden equipped with table, chairs, deck chairs barbecue and umbrella

Some more informations about the house:

Gr.floor : washing machine & laundry

Garden level : kitchen and lounge with fire place, television (wii, playstation). There is also studio couch that can easily host 2 people.

First floor : 1 double bedroom, 1 twin bedroom, 1bathroom with shower, WC bidet & wash basin

Internet available (no extra charges)

There is full service with everything clean and ready when you arrive

We take pride in the personal services we offer. Whatever you wish for please ask and we will do everything we can to help you. Upon arrival you will find information about the surrounding area and things to do during your stay.

How to get there:

Pisa & Pisa Airport just over 1 hour.

Florence about 1.45 mins.

Bologna is about 2.2 hours.

Milan 3.30 hours.

Rome 4 hour.

Viareggio beach 45-50 mins.

Lucca about 30-35 mins.

MINIMUM STAY 1 WEEK (7 nights)

200€ Deposit

all utilities included in the price except for heating.

Heating price will be added at the end of the travel depending on current price.

Whatever you wish for please ask and we will do everything we can to help you. Upon arrival you will find information about the surrounding area and things to do during your stay.

Size Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
Will consider House swap, Long term lets (over 1 month)
Access Car essential
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Pisa international airport, Nearest railway: Bagni di Lucca
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes Pets welcome, Yes, smoking allowed

Features and Facilities

Luxuries DVD player
General Central heating, TV, Video player, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 2 bedrooms, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture 2 Sofa beds, Single beds (2), Double beds (1), Dining seats for 4, Lounge seats for 4
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Outdoors Private garden

The Tuscany region

DESCRIPTION:

Tuscany is located in central Italy and stretches from the Apennines to the Tyrrhenian Sea.

Its landscape, artistic heritage and stand-out cities - first among them Florence - make Tuscany an unquestioned protagonist of international tourism. In this region, nature has many different facets, starting from the coast that alternates long and sandy beaches, like the Versilia beach, with rocky cliffs and steep headlands. The islands of the Tuscan Archipelago, surrounded by Mediterranean vegetation, a crystal-clear sea and rich seabeds, are peerless.

You can admire sceneries of uncontaminated nature in the Apuan Alps and in several protected areas, such as the Orbetello Lagoon, home to many species of migrant birds, including pink egrets.

However, the most typical sceneries of the region are those that merge the beauty of nature with the millenary work of man. The amazing Gulf of Baratti and the sites of Vetulonia, Vulci and Pitigliano guard necropoli and vestiges of the Etruscan civilization, while Roselle and Cosa evoke memories from the Roman Age.

Medieval villages, historical towns, castles and defense systems, country churches (the so-called pievi) and beautiful abbeys, like the one of Sant'Antimo, are scattered all over the territory and their profiles stand out in the landscapes of the Crete Senesi, Orcia Valley, Garfagnana, Chianti and the Maremma.

Finally, Tuscany is full of spas: Montecatini, Saturnia, Montepulciano, Monsummano and Bagno Vignoni, which offer relaxing holidays thanks to their thermal waters and well-equipped facilities for all types of treatments.

WHAT TO SEE:

Tuscany hosts innumerable astounding localities, many of which are also named UNESCO World Heritage Sites; of course, one must begin with Florence.

Famous all over the world, the ancient Signoria dei Medici is the preeminent cradle of culture and art. It is a true museum under the sky containing countless monuments, including the Duomo, with Giotto's Bell Tower; Santa Maria Novella; Palazzo Vecchio; and the Uffizi Gallery, with all its unique masterpieces.

The charm of Florence is also evident along the Arno River, on the picturesque Ponte Vecchio, and in the workshops of artisans that liven up the lanes of the old town.

Another extraordinary destination is Siena, with its Medieval town center– itself included on the UNESCO World Heritage List – and culminating with the evocative Piazza del Campo, also theatre for the famous Palio.

Pisa gathers its main monuments in Piazza dei Miracoli, among which is the Leaning Tower that makes up part of an incredibly-valuable artistic area that is protected by UNESCO as well.

Pienza is the “ideal Renaissance town” that was wanted and created by Pope Pius II. The spectacular arrangement of the spaces and the richness of the buildings make this town an artistic treasure (an additional UNESCO insertion).

San Gimignano stands out among the small towns of the region, a Medieval town characterized by its towers and “tower homes” (another site recognized by UNESCO).

Of countless other Tuscan particularities, the Orcia Valley (UNESCO) deserves to be mentioned for the beauty of its fields and landscapes that have inspired many Renaissance artists.

WHAT TO DO:

Tuscany offers a wide range of vacation proposals to satisfy all demands: “active” holidays, relaxing stays and special routes that combine nature, art and history. The coast, with its alternating sandy beaches and rocky areas, along with the islands of the Tuscan Archipelago, offer possibilities for both relaxation and physical activity, e.g. water sports: from sailing and windsurfing to canoeing and scuba diving along its beautiful seabeds.

The best way to visit the coast and its green pinewoods is on a bicycle. By night, you can certainly have fun in one of the many trendy venues and discoclubs of Viareggio, Forte dei Marmi, Porto Ercole and Porto Santo Stefano. Famous for its landscapes, Tuscany is the ideal place for a “green” holiday: from Garfagnana to the Maremma, from Casentino to Chianti - anywhere is a great place for hiking, mountain biking or horseback riding. (The area is also full of agritourisms from which to choose.)

The many protected areas reveal particular environments, like the steep heights of the Apuan Alps, Orbetello Lagoon and the Maremma National Park, dominated by the Mediterranean scrub.

Special routes lead to the discovery of the mineral resources of the region: for instance, the Archaeological and Mining Park of San Silvestro contains the millenary history of mining on these Metalliferous Hills with geological routes inside the mines; additionally, you can visit the precious white marble quarries of the Apuan Alps.

Amidst wonderful sceneries and Medieval vestiges, the Via Francigena is an extremely charming and topical spiritual itinerary that still attracts tourists and the devout alike.

If you are looking for a relaxing stay, you can spend some time in one of the region's many spas, each with different features; try Saturnia, Montecatini or Monsummano Terme, renowned for its detoxifying and skin treatments.

Plenty of food-and-wine itineraries along the wine routes include stops at wineries and farms for tasting very high-caliber wines and the genuine typical products.

Tuscany has a rich calendar of cultural, religious and folklore events: from the world-famous Palio of Siena and the Viareggio Carnival, to the Saracen Tournament in Arezzo and the “explosion of the cart” in Florence on Easter Sunday, among countless other local festivals.

WHAT TO TASTE:

The origins of Tuscan food are rather rustic, as we can see from its basic ingredients: bread, even stale bread, spelt, legumes and vegetables.

Some typical appetizers are crostini (toasted bread) topped by spreads like cream of chicken liver and spleen, panzanella, and salame, including finocchiona, a fennel-flavored salame.

The typical first course is soup, like the famous ribollita or bean soup, spelt soup, pici (a type of spaghetti from the area of Siena), or pappardelle with hare.

A famous fish dish is cacciucco soup, followed by mullets and the stockfish stew of Livorno.

Among meat dishes, the bistecca fiorentina (grilled T-bone steak) is the most popular; guinea-fowl meat, pork and game are quite common as well.

The typical desserts are castagnaccio (chestnut cake), buccellato (anise cake) and cantucci.

Wine production here is excellent for both variety and quality: Tuscany produces the finest wines in Italy, from Chianti to Vino Nobile Montepulciano, Brunello di Montalcino, Vernaccia di San Gimignano and many more. Vin Santo, a sweet and liqueur-like wine, is paired with cantucci (almond cookies, or what Americans refer to as biscotti).

Pescaglia

THE PROVINCE AND CITY OF LUCCA

DESCRIPTION:

Located in northern Tuscany, the Province of Lucca spans several different areas: the Versilia coast, overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea; Garfagnana, on the border with Emilia Romagna in the northeast; and, further inland, the Valle del Serchio and the Lucca plain.

Changing landscapes succeed each other, creating magnificent sceneries. The Parco delle Alpi Apuane provides the backdrop to the blue sea and the beaches of Versilia, while the stretches of hills covered by olive trees and woods dominate the landscape of Garfagnana. The territory is home to numerous other wonders, from Lake Massaciuccoli to the thermal springs of Bagni di Lucca and the coastal dunes of the Migliarino-San Rossore-Massaciuccoli Natural Park.

The Province is rich in tradition and history, and thanks to its central position it has been a thriving hub trade for centuries. The Via Francigena - the great Medieval pilgrimage route along which lie villages, castles, abbeys and parish churches - traversed it.

In the countryside around Lucca are beautiful historic villas surrounded by spectacular parks, from Villa Torrigiani to Villa Mansi.

These remains from the past coexist with the social life and entertainment scene on offer in Versilia's seaside resorts, including Viareggio, Lido di Camaiore, Pietrasanta and Forte dei Marmi.

From the coast inland, art centers and seaside resorts, entertainment and culture, history and nature render the Province of Lucca unique and extraordinary.

WHAT TO SEE:

The first stop on any tour of Lucca Province must be Lucca itself, a city of ancient origins, surrounded by its boundary wall that dates back to the 16th-17th Centuries.

This great work of military engineering, with its ramparts and bastions, is today a unique and scenic public area. Particularly evocative is the old town, which has kept intact its Medieval appearance composed of typical narrow streets and piazzas overlooked by stone towers, tower-houses and brick houses with arcades. Among the most typical streets, Via Fillungo stands out, the main axis here, surrounded by noble buildings and ancient towers the likes of the famous Torre delle Ore. Via Guinigi, where the complex of Medieval buildings built by well-to-do families is concentrated, is equally worth noting.

Religious architecture of particular importance includes the Duomo di San Martino with its magnificent facade and interiors rich in precious artworks; the Duomo Museum that houses paintings, sculptures and liturgical furnishings; the Church of San Michele in Foro, a unique example of Pisan-Lucchese architecture; and the splendid Basilica of San Frediano.

Outstanding examples of civil architecture are: Villa di Paolo Guinigi (15th Century), site of the National Museum showcasing Etruscan and Roman archaeological finds and several painting collections; Palazzo Mansi with its priceless furnishings and site of Lucca's second National Museum; and the 17th-Century Palazzo Moriconi-Pfanner, a magnificent example of Lucchese Baroque, surrounded by a spectacular garden. Neither should the birth house of musician Giacomo Puccini be passed up. It has been converted into a museum showcasing the maestro's documents and mementos.

The countryside in Lucca's environs offers the opportunity to visit magnificent villas, built between the late 16th and mid-19th Centuries to serve as the country residences and holiday homes for the nobility, all set inside picturesque parks. Among them two stand out the most: Villa Torrigiani with its characteristic gardens, and Villa Mansi, a splendid 16th-Century construction with frescoed rooms and a grand garden designed by architect Filippo Juvarra.

Among the historic sites, Altopascio was of great importance in Medieval times thanks to its position along the Via Francigena. The village preserves Romanesque-style buildings, churches and the famous 13th-Century bell tower, which once guided travelers with its tolls.

From the slopes of the Apuan Alps to the Migliarino-San Rossore-Massaciuccoli National Park, the splendid Versilian coastline is a highly-attractive tourist destination, thanks to its enchanting scenery, rich plant life and fascinating places. See the romantic Torre del Lago Puccini, where it is possible to see the villa-museum of Giacomo Puccini; it is here that he found inspiration for his masterpiece Madame Butterfly.

Other touristic hotspots within Versilia are Viareggio, famous for its carnival but also for its beaches and nightlife; the elegant Forte dei Marmi; Pietrasanta and its rich artistic heritage; and Camaiore, with its Romanesque architecture.

Do not miss the Valle del Serchio or Garfagnana with their characteristic villages - among them Borgo a Mozzano, famous for its spectacular Devil's Bridge; and Barga, an enchanting Medieval village with its prized architecture.

Other towns typical of Garfagnana are Castelvecchio Pascoli, featuring the house-museum of Italian poet Giovanni Pascoli, and the chapel that guards his remains; and Castelnuovo di Garfagnana, whose Duomo and Fortress are nestled in a spectacular and inspiring landscape.

WHAT TO DO:

The coast provides great opportunities to spend entire days relaxing by the sea, engaging in water sports or bike rides through the pinewoods.

The Apuan Alps are the ideal setting for strolling, trekking and trips on horseback. One must is an excursion to the Grotta del Vento, an amazing cave system with spectacular stalactites.

At Terme di Bagni di Lucca, one can indulge in therapeutic treatments and spend relaxing days immersed in the mesmerizing scenery.

The local calendar is chock-full of events, from the Carnevale di Viareggio, the national literary prize Viareggio Rèpaci (in June) and the Puccini Festival at Torre del Lago (July and August).

Among historical re-enactments, the Calderon d'Altopascio (July) is one worth attending.

Some important religious festivals are the Luminara Procession of Santa Croce to Lucca (September) and the Procioni Procession of Garfagnana di Castiglione (yearly on Maundy Thursday).

WHAT TO TASTE:

The gastronomy of Lucca is rooted in ancient traditions.

Of the first courses, soups have an important place, especially the garmucia (a soup with artichokes, peas, broad beans and asparagus).

Local specialties include roasted pork, pork with chestnut polenta, lamb with olives, spit-roasted thrush, and spit-roasted Serchio trout.

Recommended deserts include: buccellato, a typical doughnut-shaped dessert; castagnaccio, a tart made with chestnut flour; and necci, also made with chestnut flour.

Among the flavorsome local wines try Montecarlo white or red. Biadina is a typical liquor from Lucca.