Studio | No Bedrooms | sleeps 2

Key Info
  • Beach or lakeside relaxation
  • Great for children of all ages
  • No pets allowed
  • Car advised
  • Nearest beach 2km

A VERY MODERN HOLIDAY LET STUDIO APARTMENT LOCATED IN A QUIET POSITION ON THE ISLE OF PORTLAND NEAR WEYMOUTH IN THE HEART OF DORSET ON THE COAST OF SOUTH WEST ENGLAND. SUITABLE FOR SINGLE OR DOUBLE OCCUPANCY, BUT CAN SUPPLY AN EXTRA GUEST BED IF REQUIRED AT AN ADDITIONAL COST(PLEASE ENQUIRE BEFORE BOOKING) - CHILDREN UNDER 5 FREE. FACILITIES INCLUDE FLAT SCREEN TV, MICROWAVE, COMPLIMENTARY TEA AND COFFEE AND FREE CAR PARKING. SITUATED ON A CLIFFTOP WITH BREATHTAKING VIEWS ACROSS PORTLAND BILL AND THE ENGLISH CHANNEL. A PERFECT LOCATION TO ESCAPE THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF EVERYDAY LIFE, RELAX AND ENJOY THE BEAUTIFUL COUNTRYSIDE AND JURASSIC COASTLINE. THERE IS AN ON-SITE RESTAURANT OFFERING LOCALLY SOURCED PRODUCE WITH A DAILY CHANGING MENU OF FRESHLY CAUGHT FISH. LOCATED WITHIN THE ON-SITE HOTEL IS THE OCEAN SPA, WHICH IS DORSET'S PREMIER LUXURY DAY SPA AND HEALTH CLUB. THE SAILING ACADEMY IS LESS THAN 3 MILES AWAY. WEYMOUTH IS A 15 MINUTE DRIVE AND CHESIL BEACH A BRISK WALK ALONG THE CLIFFTOP. THERE IS DIRECT ACCESS FROM THE PROPERTY TO THE COASTAL PATH ABOVE THE SEA.

THE APARTMENT IS AVAILABLE ALL YEAR ROUND.

www.pagemost.com/dt52na HAS A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF THINGS TO DO IN THE SURROUNDING AREA, DETAILS OF ATTRACTIONS, LANDMARKS AND MUCH MORE.

Size Sleeps up to 2, Studio
Nearest beach CHURCH OPE COVE AND/OR CHESIL BEACH 2 km
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 2 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: BOURNEMOUTH 74 km, Nearest railway: WEYMOUTH 13 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player, Sea view
General TV
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Hair dryer
Utilities Clothes dryer, Microwave, Fridge
Rooms 1 bathrooms of which 1 En suites
Furniture Single beds (2), Dining seats for 2, Lounge seats for 2
Other Linen provided, Towels provided
Access Parking, Lift access

The West Country region

The Isle of Portland is a limestone tied island, 6 kilometres (4 mi) long by 2.4 kilometres (1.5 mi) wide, in the English Channel. Portland is 8 kilometres (5 mi) south of the resort of Weymouth, forming the southernmost point of the county of Dorset, England. A barrier beach over which runs the A354 road connects it to Chesil Beach and the mainland. Portland and Weymouth together form the borough of Weymouth and Portland. The population of Portland is 12,400.

Portland is a central part of the Jurassic Coast, a World Heritage Site on the Dorset and east Devon coast, important for its geology and landforms. Its name is used for one of the British Sea Areas, and has been exported as the name of North American and Australian towns. Portland stone, famous for its use in British and world architecture, including St Paul's Cathedral and the United Nations Headquarters, continues to be quarried.

Portland Harbour, in the bay between Portland and Weymouth, is one of the largest man-made harbours in the world. The harbour was formed by the building of stone breakwaters between 1848 and 1905. From its inception it was a Royal Navy base, and played prominent roles during the First and Second World Wars; ships of the Royal Navy and NATO countries worked up and exercised in its waters until 1995. The harbour is now a civilian port and popular recreation area, and was used for the 2012 Olympic Games.

Weymouth

Dorset (pron.: /?d?rs?t/) (or archaically, Dorsetshire), is a county in South West England on the English Channel coast. The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county, which is governed by Dorset County Council, and the unitary authorities of Poole and Bournemouth. Covering an area of 2,653 square kilometres (1,024 sq mi), Dorset borders Devon to the west, Somerset to the north-west, Wiltshire to the north-east, and Hampshire to the east. The county town is Dorchester which is situated in the south. After the reorganisation of local government in 1974 the county's border was extended eastward to incorporate the Hampshire towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch. Around half of the population lives in the South East Dorset conurbation, while the rest of the county is largely rural with a low population density.

The county has a long history of human settlement stretching back to the Neolithic era. The Romans conquered Dorset's indigenous Celtic tribe, and during the early Middle Ages, the Saxons settled the area and made Dorset a shire in the 7th century. The first recorded Viking raid on the British Isles occurred in Dorset during the 8th century and the black death entered England at Melcombe Regis in 1348. Dorset has seen much civil unrest: during the English Civil War an uprising of vigilantes was crushed by Cromwell's forces in a pitched battle near Shaftesbury; the Duke of Monmouth's doomed rebellion began at Lyme Regis; and a group of farm labourers from Tolpuddle were instrumental in the formation of the trade union movement. During the Second World War, Dorset was heavily involved in the preparations for the invasion of Normandy and the large harbours of Portland and Poole were two of the main embarkation points on D-Day.

Dorset has a varied landscape featuring broad elevated chalk downs, steep limestone ridges and low-lying clay valleys. Over half the county is designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and three-quarters of its coastline is a World Heritage Site that features notable landforms such as Lulworth Cove, the Isle of Portland, Chesil Beach and Durdle Door. Agriculture was traditionally the major industry of Dorset but is now in decline and tourism has become increasingly important to the economy. There are no motorways in Dorset but a network of A roads cross the county and two railway main lines connect to London. Dorset has ports at Poole, Weymouth and Portland and an international airport. The county has a variety of museums, theatres and festivals, and is host to one of Europe's largest outdoor shows. It is the birthplace of Thomas Hardy, who used the county as the principal setting of his novels, and William Barnes, whose poetry celebrates the ancient Dorset dialect.