House | 4 bedrooms | sleeps 9

Key Info
  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car not necessary
  • No pets allowed

Historic Victorian style home on a famous steep street featured in most books of Ireland. Stone house was built in 1850 but recently remodeled with new amenities while still retaining original charm. Second floor has 2 bedrooms including large room with bay window. Third floor has two bedrooms. Home sleeps 9 comfortably. One large bathroom with new tub and shower on second floor and one bathroom (toilet/sink) on first floor. Brand new central heating and fully equipped kitchen. House has standard Irish television and stereo with iPod docking station. Views from the back of the house include neo-Gothic cathedral and front of the house include the Bishops Palace and park. Head up the hill for a few pints with the locals at The Roaring Donkey. Beautiful Cork Harbor and downtown Cobh is at foot of the street with many more pubs, restaurants and cafes. Only 5 minute walk to the train station. 30 minutes from Cork City by train or car. Cobh is a favorite port of call for numerous cruise ships from all over the world. House and famous 'deck of cards' street is on the cover of the 2012 Lonely Planet Ireland travel guide.

Cobh (formerly Queenstown) is a beautiful seaside town in County Cork and is steeped in history. It was the last port of call for the Titanic and still maintains that original pier. Visitors can participate in the Titanic Experience and visit the museum. Cobh was also where most immigrants left Ireland to begin their journeys to the new world and has a wonderful Heritage Centre highlighting this era. Assistance in genealogical searches is avaialable at the Centre. A short train ride away takes you to the beautiful historic Fota House and Grounds as well as the amazing Fota Wildlife Park where the animals run free. St. Coleman's cathedral is an awe inspiring example of neo-Gothic architecture dating back to 1868. The cathedral features a beautiful 49 bell carillon which is the largest in Ireland and Britain. If you are looking for breathtaking scenery this is the place. Short walks will take you to the waters edge and beaches and to beautiful rolling hills displaying the famous Irish 40 shades of green. Sailing, harbor boat trips and sea angling excursions are available. If golf is your thing the Cobh Golf Course is minutes away or in an hour or less you can be golfing in the spectacular Fota or Old Head of Kinsale Golf Courses. A short train and bus ride away and your at the famous Blarney Castle where you can kiss the Blarney Stone and get the gift of the gab! Many events take place during the year including commemorations of the Titanic and the Lusitania in April and May. Summertime includes the South of Ireland Festival of Piping and Drumming and the Cobh Peoples' Regatta. September brings the Blues Festival and the International Sea Angling Festival and October boasts the world famous Cork Jazz Festival.

By car you can take many day trips from Cobh to explore the beauty of Ireland. You are only only 1 1/2 hours away from the quaint town of Killarney and the Killarney National Park. Killarney is minutes away from the amazing Ring of Kerry which is a beautiful drive through the mountains.

The majestic Cliffs of Moher are only 2 1/2 hours away as is the beautiful seaside town of Dingle and its famous dolphin Fungie!

In 1 1/2 hours you can be taking a tour of the Waterford Crystal Factory where they have worldwide shipping if you can't pass up making a purchase.

The whole area of West Cork is only a 1 1/2 hours away with awe inspiring natural beauty.

If you want to travel by train, make the 5 minute walk to the Cobh Train Station where you can travel to Cork and catch connecting trains all over the country.

Size Sleeps up to 9, 4 bedrooms
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car not necessary
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Cork Airport, Nearest railway: Cobh Railway Station
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries DVD player, Sea view
General Central heating, Satellite TV
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Clothes dryer, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 4 bedrooms, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Shower rooms
Furniture Single beds (3), Double beds (2), Cots (1), Dining seats for 6, Lounge seats for 6
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Access Parking

The County Cork region

Cork is the largest county in Ireland, and its size has had an appreciable effect on the mentality of its inhabitants; they have been known to refer to journeys to other parts of Ireland as "visiting the Republic".

The county has an extraordinary variety of landscapes, from the lush lowlands and valleys of east and central Cork to the barren magnificence of the mountains and peninsulas of west Cork. Cork city is the second largest in Ireland, though not in the minds of many Corkonians, and is beautifully situated at the mouth of the Lee valley.

With a major International Airport just south of Cork City, getting to County Cork could not be easier. Fishing, golf, horse riding, biking, hiking and an endless variety of all season activities are just a few minutes walk or a short drive from your accomodation. Your holiday in County Cork can be as full of adventure and excitement as you could wish for. But for those desiring a holiday of peace and quite away from the mad rush of cities, it is a place of quiet roads, a haven of peace and relaxation in an unspoilt enviroment. Within minutes you can be totally alone in the rolling green countryside along side beautiful clean rivers with not a sound of traffic to be heard or another person to be seen.

Corcaigh (in Irish) The largest county of Ireland, Cork is tucked away in the south western corner of Ireland along with county Kerry . It is bordered by Co. Waterford to it's east and by counties Tipperary and Limerick to the north.

North Cork is a mix of rolling green hills and mountains but also has some of Ireland's richest pastures in the Golden Vale

East Cork is a region with gentle hills and beautiful beaches

To the south and west of the county the region know as West Cork , boasts a wild and rugged coastline of rocky headlands, great bays and secret coves warmed by the Gulf Stream.

Like many counties in Ireland Cork's main industries are farming, fishing and tourism. The remote westerly region of West Cork has become a popular destination for those wanting to get away from the hustle and bustle to enjoy a slower pace of life around small, rural fishing villages and towns, amid some of the most spectacular coastal scenery in Ireland. West Cork is popular with the yachting crowd who gather each summer in the tiny harbours of Baltimore, Schull and Kinsale, the historic port renowned as the culinary capital of Ireland. In this region of the country, you'll also find Ireland's most southerly point; Mizen Head.

Cobh

The distinctive town of Cobh (pronounced cove) is built onto the slope of Great Island in Cork Harbour just 15 miles from Cork City. The towering St Colman's Cathedral, French Gothic in style, stands at the top of the hill overlooking the tall brightly coloured buildings of Cobh and the dockside of the most important port of emigration in the country. The port was called Queenstown, renamed following a visit from Queen Victoria in 1849, until it reverted back to its Irish name in 1922.

Cobh's long maritime history includes the world's first yacht club, the Royal Cork Yacht Club established in 1720, the first steamship to sail across the Atlantic, the Sirius, sailed from Cobh in 1838, Cobh was the last port of call for the Titanic on her tragic maiden voyage and Cobh was where survivors of the Lusitania were brought after the ship was torpedoed by German U-Boats off the Old Head of Kinsale in 1915. 150 victims of the Lusitania are buried in graves in the Old Church just north of Cobh.

Yet what Cobh is most associated with is the mass exodus from Ireland during the 19th Century. Once called "the saddest place in all of Ireland", Cobh was the embarkation port of some 2.5 million Irish emigrants fleeing famine and poverty between the 1848 and 1950. Their tale is told in the award winning exhibition centre, the Queenstown Story, housed in the disused Victorian Railway by the dockside.

Though a town with a sorrowful past, Cobh is a vibrant hub of activity and interest. A quaint town of narrow streets, winding up steep hills, Cobh has a number of old-fashioned pubs and good quality restaurants. Cobh is a popular spot for sailing and there are harbour cruises around Haulbowline Island and the former prison of Spike Island.