Barn | 6 bedrooms | sleeps 25

Key Info
  • Beach or lakeside relaxation
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Some pets are welcome - please contact the owner
  • Private garden
  • Car advised
  • Nearest beach 12km

WE ARE OFFERING A 20% DISCOUNT FOR JUNE JULY AND AUGUST 2013!

The Barn and Cottages together can sleep up to a maximum of 25 guests. The comfortable capacity is 20-21 in 6 doubles and 4 twins. There is also a day (Alice) bed, a sofa bed and 2 chair beds.

Penbridge Court is a 200 year-old barn that has been lovingly restored refurbished and refurnished.

In the western foothills of the Quantocks in Somerset right on the edge of the Quantocks Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Barn is spacious and spectacular, a perfect place for friends and family retreats, reunions and celebrations.

It includes a huge country kitchen in the modern-rustic style. The Barn is massive and sleeps 12 adults comfortably but also has a day bed, a sofa bed and 2 chair beds. The Barn may be booked with up to 3 delightful cottages, The Stable (bungalow 2+2) and Sunset (upstairs 2), and The Byre (bungalow 2). If Sunset or Byre are booked with the Barn then capacity is a comfortable 17-19

The hamlet of Trebles Holford sits 7 miles each way from Taunton and J25 of the M5 and Williton, and just a couple of miles from local shops in Crowcombe and Bishops Lydeard. The beaches at Blue Anchor are just 15 minutes drive away, Minehead 30 mins and Exmouth one hour.

It is also perfect for hen and stag parties, trekkers, walkers, mountain bikers and shooting parties. We welcome long weekenders Fri, Sat, Sun nights and Midweekers Mon to Thurs nights. These are charged at 75% of the full week rate.

There is a large enclosed garden with BBQ patio and classic Cashen hot tub. West Somerset Railway steam engines can be seen chuffing back and forth. Also the Dean Way runs along the west edge of the property and it is possible to wander 100m right down to the railway line. It is well served with excellent local gastropubs such as the Farmers Arms in Combe Florey, Rising Sun in West Bagborough, Carew Arms in Crowcombe and the Blue Ball Inn in Triscombe.

Size Sleeps up to 25, 6 bedrooms
Nearest beach Blue Anchor, near Watchet 12 km
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised, Wheelchair users
Nearest Amenities 3 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Bristol or Exeter 60 km, Nearest railway: Taunton 12 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes Pets welcome, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Jacuzzi or hot tub, Log fire, Internet access, DVD player
General Central heating, TV, CD player, Telephone, Pool or snooker table, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron
Utilities Clothes dryer, Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 6 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms of which 3 Family bathrooms, 3 En suites and 1 Shower rooms
Furniture 2 Sofa beds, Single beds (6), Double beds (7), Cots (2), Dining seats for 24, Lounge seats for 24
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Outdoors Private garden, BBQ
Access Parking, Wheelchair users

The West Country region

(With thanks to Wiki) - West Somerset is packed with something for everyone - history, culture, castles, steam trains, horse riding and trekking, beautiful gentle walks, beaches and fossil hunting.

Coleridge Cottage is a 17th C cottage in Nether Stowey. It is an English Heritage grade II* listed building. The poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge lived here for three years from 1797 while he wrote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, part of Christabel, Frost at Midnight and Kubla Khan.

Poet William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy lived at Alfoxton House in Holford between July 1797 and June 1798, during the time of their friendship with Coleridge. The 2000 film Pandaemonium, based on the lives of Wordsworth and Coleridge, was set in the hills.

Virginia and Leonard Woolf spent a few days of their honeymoon at The Plough Inn, Holford, before continuing to the continent in 1912. They returned about a year later to try to help Virginia recover from one of her recurring nervous breakdowns.

The opening of John le Carré's 1974 novel Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is set in the Quantocks.

The 1980 Doctor Who episode "Shada" makes a sidelong reference to this region – the Fourth Doctor (played by Tom Baker) claims that walking through the Time Vortex "is a little trick I learned from a space-time mystic in the Quantocks". In the 1980s and 1990s, English novelist Ruth Elwin Harris wrote her Quantock Quartet, a set of novels centred on four sisters growing up around the Quantock Hills during the early 20th century. The novels were later reprinted by Candlewick Press. The Quantocks were also the setting for the final episodes of the third and eighth series (2006 and 2012) of Peep Show, while the video to the Bryan Adams hit (Everything I Do) I Do It for You was filmed in the landscape of Holford and Kilve.

'Checking out the Quantocks', is a line from the song Joy Division Oven Gloves by Half Man Half Biscuit from their album Achtung Bono

The Church of St Mary in Kingston St Mary dates from the 13th century, but the tower is from the early 16th century and was re-roofed in 1952, with further restoration from 1976 to 1978. It is a three-stage crenellated tower, with crocketed pinnacles, bracketed pinnacles set at angles, decorative pierced merlons, and set-back buttresses crowned with pinnacles. The decorative "hunky-punks" are perched high on the corners. These may be so named because the carvings are hunkering (squatting) and are "punch" (short and thick). They serve no function, unlike gargoyles that carry off water. The churchyard includes tombs of the Warre family who owned nearby Hestercombe House, a historic country house in Cheddon Fitzpaine visited by about 70,000 people per year. The site includes a 0.2-acre (810 m2) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest notified. The site is used for roosting by Lesser horseshoe bats and has been designated as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC).

The Norman Church of St Giles in Thurloxton dates from the 14th century but is predominantly from the 15th century with 19th century restoration, including the addition of the north aisle in 1868. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II* listed building.

The West Somerset Railway (WSR) is a heritage railway that runs along the edge of the Quantock Hills between Bishops Lydeard and Watchet. The line then turns inland to Washford, and returns to the coast for the run to Minehead. At 23 miles (37 km), it is the longest privately owned passenger rail line in the UK.

Halsway Manor in Halsway, is now used as England's National Centre for Traditional Music, Dance and Song. It is the only residential folk centre in the UK. The eastern end of the building dates from the 15th century and the western end was a 19th-century addition. The manor, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book, was at one time used by Cardinal Beaufort as a hunting lodge and thereafter as a family home until the mid-1960s when it became the folk music centre. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II* listed building.

Halswell House in Goathurst has Tudor origins but was purchased by the Tynte family and rebuilt in 1689. The surrounding park and 17 acres (6.9 ha) pleasure garden was developed between 1745 and 1785. The grounds contain many fish ponds, cascades, bridges and fanciful buildings, including the Temple of Harmony, which stands in Mill Wood and has now been fully restored.

Taunton

(With thanks to Wiki) - Penbridge Court Barn and Cottages are set on the edges of the Quantock Hills and Exmoor National Park. The Quantock Hills were England's first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (1956) and comprise heathland, oak woodlands, ancient parklands and agricultural land.

The hills run from the Vale of Taunton Deane in the south, for about 15 miles (24 km) to the north-west, ending at East Quantoxhead and West Quantoxhead on the coast of the Bristol Channel. They form the western border of Sedgemoor and the Somerset Levels. From the top of the hills on a clear day, it is possible to see Glastonbury Tor and the Mendips to the east, Wales as far as the Gower Peninsula to the north, the Brendon Hills and Exmoor to the west, and the Blackdown Hills to the south. The highest point on the Quantocks is Wills Neck, at 1,261 feet (384 m). The Quantocks have been occupied since prehistoric times with Bronze Age round barrows and Iron Age hill forts. Evidence from Roman times includes silver coins discovered in West Bagborough. In the later Saxon period, King Alfred led the resistance to Viking invasion, and Watchet was plundered by Danes in 987 and 997. The hills were fought over during the English Civil War and Monmouth Rebellion but are now a peaceful area popular with walkers, mountain bikers, horse riders and tourists. They explore paths such as the, the Deane Way (this runs around the edge of Penbridge Court), Coleridge Way used by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who lived in Nether Stowey from 1797 to 1799, or visit places of interest such as Quantock Lodge.