House | 8 bedrooms | sleeps 18

Key Info
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car advised
  • Pets welcome
  • Private garden

Blo Norton Hall sleeps a max of 18 persons in 8 bedrooms, 6 with ensuite bathrooms, located in the pretty South Norfolk village of Blo Norton. The Village itself is surrounded by quiet lanes, ideal for walking, cycling and painting and is close to Redgrave and Lopham Fen. Blo Norton is set within an 800 acre estate surrounded by farmland and woodland.

Blo Norton Hall is the perfect choice for a relaxed stay in the East Anglian Countryside. Blo Norton is situated close to the picturesque Norfolk and Suffolk Borders making it ideal to explore all that both counties have to offer. Blo Norton lies on the River Little Ouse which separates Suffolk from Norfolk. The Hall reputedly provided the setting for Virginia Wolf's short story The Journal of Miss Joan Martyn. In the story the main character, Rosamund Merridew, is a historian researching England's land-tenure system.

Size Sleeps up to 18, 8 bedrooms
Nearest beach A
Will consider Corporate bookings, Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Norwich 45 km, Nearest railway: Diss 9 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes Pets welcome, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Log fire, Internet access, DVD player
General Central heating, TV, CD player, Telephone, Table tennis, Games room, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron
Utilities Clothes dryer, Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 8 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms and 6 En suites
Furniture Single beds (8), Double beds (3), Cots (1), Dining seats for 18, Lounge seats for 18
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Outdoors Private garden, Shared garden, BBQ, Swing set
Access Parking
Further details indoors

The house is furnished throughout with antique furniture. Family portraits and other pictures line the grand oak staircase and reception rooms. The entrance hall leads into the Main Hall where access to the drawing room with the hi tech hi fi allowing piped music through out the ground floor and the Sitting room where one can relax watching Tv or just admire the gardens, the fireplaces are a real treat in the autumn to keep you cozy and warm. The large charismatic open plan kitchen is on the east of the entrance hall with direct access into the gardens. Small twin bedroom available for the less able.

The first floor corridor leads to six luxurious bedrooms with six bathrooms / shower rooms ( five en-suite).

The second floor provides outstanding views of the surrounding gardens and offers a further king sized bedroom with en-suite and a further large lounging area with TV and Ping Pong Table, ideal for the kids.

Further details outdoors

Nestled between farmland and woodland, great fun for children and adults to explore in a safe environment. Wellies will be required as there is a working farm with cattle. The gardens around Blo Norton Hall are lovingly attended and will be a treat for anyone who enjoys their gardening. For the budding artists, its an ideal spot to truly relax and put brust to canvass.

Further details

A welcome basket is supplied for the booking party

Wi Fi is available free of charge

The main gardens have 2 ponds, these are not gated off and can be deep

The Hall can be hired together with any of the barns on the estate.

The East Anglia region

Lo Norton Hall is the perfect choice for a relaxed stay in the East Anglian Countryside. Blo Norton is situated close to the picturesque Norfolk and Suffolk Borders making it ideal to explore all that both counties have to offer. Blo Norton lies on the River Little Ouse which separates Suffolk from Norfolk. The Hall reputedly provided the setting for Virginia Wolf’s short story The Journal of Miss Joan Martyn. In the story the main character, Rosamund Merridew, is a historian researching England's land-tenure system.

Diss

Many towns claim to be 'historic market towns', but there has been a market in the centre of Diss, on the Norfolk/Suffolk border for well over 500 years. The town, which lies in the beautiful Waveney Valley, was established around one of the deepest natural inland lakes in the country. The 6 acre Mere is 18 feet deep, but below this is another 51 feet of mud! The water level is maintained by a number of underground springs near to the northern edge.

Attractions in the area include the town's award winning museum located to the north of the Market Place, the wonderful Steam Museum and Gardens at Bressingham and the zoo at Banham.