House | 4 bedrooms | sleeps 8

Key Info
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car advised
  • No pets allowed
  • Private garden

Old Brewery House is a special place! A secret hideaway, yet within minutes of some of the Cotswolds most delightful towns and attractions, the property lends itself perfectly to family holidays and re-unions or group get togethers. Set over three floors, each room is big enough for a party, has its own bathroom and they all retain their original period features. The garden is truly stunning, with a croquet lawn, a beautiful river running through the valley, a lake teeming with swans, ducks and peacocks!

The setting and architecture of Old Brewery House and the buildings that surround it are quintessentially Cotswolds and utterly idyllic. This is unique in its location, right in the heart of Donnington Brewery, the buildings of which date back as far as the 12th Century when it was a working mill. In 1827 it was bought by Thomas Arkell, whose descendant Richard Arkell started a Brewery there in 1865. It remains a working brewery today and although running full time, has very little impact on the house or its occupants. Donnington Brewery is not open to the public and access to the brewery buildings is understandably prohibited.

There is however plenty of opportunity to enjoy the end results nearby! The Coach and Horses at Ganborough or the Golden Ball in Lower Swell are just over a mile away in each direction. If you walk to either, the landlords will return you to Old Brewery House with their complements (ring in advance)! Donnington Brewery has a further 14 pubs within the Cotswolds and they are linked by a 62 mile circular walk, the Donnington Way, that takes in some of the most spectacular parts of rural Gloucestershire. Even a small section of the route would offer a rather brilliant challenge for your Stay in the Cotswolds!

Size Sleeps up to 8, 4 bedrooms
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 5 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Birmingham or Bristol 60 km, Nearest railway: Moreton in Marsh or Kingham 10 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player
General Central heating, TV, CD player, Telephone, Safe, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Clothes dryer, Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms of which 4 En suites
Furniture 1 Sofa beds, Single beds (8), Double beds (4), Cots (1), Dining seats for 10, Lounge seats for 10
Other High chair
Outdoors Private garden, BBQ
Access Parking
Further details indoors

Main Living Area/Sitting Room is a gorgeous and light room in the centre of the house, with sofas, plasma TV, wood burner and amazing views out to the lake that plays host to an array of wildfowl including both black and white swans, geese, ducks and moorhen. Stunning peacocks also strut their stuff and display their beauty around the property too! A downstairs loo can be found just off this room at the foot of the stairs.

From main living area a passageway to the left leads to a secondary Living Area/Snug Room with plasma TV and sofas, armchairs and beanbags. Please note that the sofa is also a sofa bed and this can be made up as a fifth bedroom. A small entrance hall/porch can also be found off the snug room.

From the main living area the passageway to the right leads to a fabulous and fully equipped kitchen with island, double Everhot range cooker, huge floor to ceiling windows, kitchen table with seating for up to 12. Off the kitchen and down the staircase leads to a Utility Room with access from the gardens with traditional stone floor, butlers sink, washing machine and separate dryer, chest freezer, plus drying room. Perfect to kick off your boots and hang up any wet clothes after a long walk!

From Main Living Area climb the staircase to a large landing area where you can reach four en-suite double bedrooms.

Garden Room: Beautiful views to the garden. A large bedroom with double bed, small vanity table, small sofa, built in wardrobe and shelving. Fire-place. Tiled en-suite shower with loo and basin.

Lake room: stunning views onto the lake. A large bedroom with double bed, chest of drawers/vanity table, built in wardrobe, and fireplace. Tiled en-suite with shower/bath, loo and basin.

Green Room: A large bedroom with double bed and day-bed/sofa, small vanity table and mirror, and fireplace. Tiled en-suite shower/bath with loo and basin.

Attic Room: Up a small staircase to a quirky attic room full of character with standard double bed plus camp bed option, with hanging rail and chest of drawers. Tiled en-suite with bath, loo and basin.

Further details outdoors

Truly stunning gardens with old croquet lawn, a beautiful river through the garden (parents of small children be aware). The setting and architecture of Old Brewery House and the buildings that surround it are quintessentially Cotswolds and utterly idyllic. This is unique in its location, right in the heart of Donnington Brewery, the buildings of which date back as far as the 12th Century. In 1827 it was bought by Thomas Arkell, whose descendant Richard Arkell started a Brewery there in 1865. It remains a working brewery today and although running full time, has very little impact on the house or its occupants. Donnington Brewery is not open to the public and access to the brewery buildings is understandably prohibited although the housekeeper will be pleased to arrange delivery.

The Central England/Cotswolds region

Less than 2 miles from Stow on the Wold and Moreton in Marsh and approximately 7 miles to Bourton on the Water. Chipping Norton, Chipping Campden and Broadway are all less than 20 minutes drive. Stratford on Avon, Cheltenham, Warwick and Tewkesbury are a little over half an hour away by car.

Architecturally, Stow has many historic buildings around the market square, having risen to prosperity on the back of the wool trade in medieval times.The 15th century St Edwards parish church played a role in the civil war. The old town stocks still stand though not used much in recent years. These days, Stow has many boutique and antique shops to browse around and pubs and restaurants provide a large choice of places to eat.

Further afield villages built with the traditional honey coloured Cotswold limestone are within easy reach. Broadway Tower on the edge of the Cotswolds has views of 16 counties, so they say. Blenheim Palace, birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill, Stratford on Avon or Snowshill Manor are all less than 45 minutes.

For those interested in walking, there are numerous walks in and around Stow, varying from gentle strolls to extended walks. A map of local walks can be had from the information centre or local shops. Cycles may be hired in Bourton on the Water and are an ideal way to explore the quieter back country lanes and the smaller villages of the Cotswolds, but the hills can be steep!

Cheltenham Festival Week, home of the famous Gold Cup, happens every March. Stow is only 35 minutes from the races.

Location Information: Sitting elegantly in the middle of the world famous Cotswold’s countryside, Stow-on-the-Wold is the quintessential English market town. Stow is a natural and historic meeting place, with a fine selection of 16th century Cotswold stone shops, luxury hotels, chic bistros, inns, elegant manor house hotels and cosy teashops. The combination of rural informality and fine food and drink makes this small market town the ideal destination for a holiday or weekend break. Along with Moreton-in-Marsh and Bourton-in-the-Water, Stow is one of the best known of the small Cotswold towns. It is the highest point in the Cotswolds, standing on top of an 800 feet hill, and is situated at the meeting place of seven roads, including the Roman Fosse Way, which runs from Exeter to Lincoln in an almost straight line

Great centre for discovering this most attractive part of England, with its sleepy stone villages and interesting market towns. Also good for walkers, birdwatchers, cyclists, theatre/opera goers and those interested in historical buildings. Close to Bourton on the Water, Broadway, Chipping Campden, Chipping Norton and within 45 mins drive of Oxford, Stratford on Avon and Cheltenham.

A particularly good location for walkers, cyclists and National Trust lovers. Also great for horse racing, with courses at Cheltenham, Stratford and Warwick all less than 45 mins away. Theatre goers are spoilt for choice with the Stratford memorial theatre, Cheltenham Playhouse and Oxford Playhouse easily available, while the Longborough Festival Summer Opera is a short walk away. Sports centres and swimming pools are available at Chipping Campden and Chipping Norton and there are riding stables and fishing lakes locally. For water sports, the Cotswold Water Park is less than an hour away.

Stow on the Wold

Location Information: Lower Swell is a beautiful Cotswold village located on the River Dikler (which runs through the Brewery as well!), one mile from Stow-on-the-Wold. The village has a tranquil green, mellow stone cottages and is surrounded by stunning countryside. Lower Swell contains a traditional Cotswold pub, the Golden Ball Inn, which serves fresh food and local ales. Srow-on-the-Wold is one of the main Cotswold market towns and contains numerous, shops, pubs and restaurants – see above for further information. In 1086 the manor of Lower Swell was owned by Raoul II of Tosny and William II, Count of Eu. In the 13th century the Lower Swell manor was sold to Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall (formally 'King of the Romans', from 1257). In the 16th century it was exchanged back and forth between the Crown and the Bishop of London. Other notable owners include Sir Robert Atkyns, who was an English Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Member of Parliament and Speaker of the House of Lords. His son, also Sir Robert Atkyns, lived in Lower Swell and wrote “Ancient and Present State of Gloucestershire”. In the Middle Ages the village's name was Little Swell. Documents indicate that the village was well developed by the 17th century, although it was probably well developed much earlier. There are a few ancient ancient burial chambers located around Lower Swell. Some of them are marked with menhirs - standing stones. One of these stones is named the Whittlestone. There is a local legend that the Whittlestone once belonged to an immovable megalith, from which any stones moved would return to their initial places the morning after they are moved. The Whittlestone was moved, however, and contrary to the legend it remains at the location that it was moved to in the centre of Lower Swell. Another legend states that the Whittlestone is a moving megalith, and every night, 'when the Whistlestone hears Stow clock (a mile off) strike 12, it goes down to Lady-well (and the hill’s foot) to drink”. Stow-on-the-Wold: Sitting elegantly in the middle of the world famous Cotswold’s countryside, Stow-on-the-Wold is the quintessential English market town. Stow is a natural and historic meeting place, with a fine selection of 16th century Cotswold stone shops, luxury hotels, chic bistros, inns, elegant manor house hotels and cosy teashops. Along with Moreton-in-Marsh and Bourton-in-the-Water, Stow is one of the best known of the small Cotswold towns. It is the highest point in the Cotswolds, standing on top of an 800 feet hill, and is situated at the meeting place of seven roads, including the Roman Fosse Way, which runs from Exeter to Lincoln in an almost straight line. Iron Age people were the first to settle in Stow, but there is also evidence of earlier settlements in this part of the Cotswolds, as Stone Age and Bronze Age burial mounds are common throughout the area. The first name of the town was St. Edward's Stowe or Holy Place, named after a Saxon missionary. The word 'wold' as in ‘Cotswold’ means hills, so Stow-on-the-Wold simply means Holy Place on the Hill. Stow-on-the-Wold in the 21st century looks quite a lot like Stow-on-the-Wold in the 17th century. It is the hub and service town for a rural community, but has maintained its traditional character. Stow is largely a town of small independent businesses, rather than the large chains that make many towns in England look the same. It is this traditional character, and therefore individuality, combined with the beautiful honey-coloured Cotswold stone buildings, that make Stow so popular with tourists looking for ‘picture-postcard’ England. The town’s tourist trade makes it possible for Stow to support many more good hotels, B&B’s, pubs and restaurants than most other towns with a population of around 2,000. Stow has been famous for many years as a centre for the antiques trade and in the last few years clusters of art galleries and fashionable clothing shops have added further character to the town centre.