Villa | 2 bedrooms | sleeps 4

Key Info
  • Swimming pool
  • Great for children of all ages 5
  • Car advised
  • No pets allowed

Situated to the North of Tuscany La Locanda del Moro provides you with a different Tuscany experience. This property of 2 villas gives you total peace and relaxation but also has the possibility of an active holiday due to the wealth of activities in the area.

You enter the villa into the main living area; to one side there is a fully equipped kitchenette that includes gas hobs, dishwasher, microwave and fridge/freezer. In this room there is also a wooden table that seats four and a large comfortable sofa.

To the left there is the sleeping area that is composed of a double bedroom and a twin bedroom. From the double room there are excellent views of the valley below. Between the two bedrooms there is a bathroom with shower.

Size Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
Will consider Corporate bookings, Long term lets (over 1 month)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 200 m
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: PISA 74 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access
General TV, CD player, Safe, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster
Utilities Dishwasher, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer
Rooms 2 bedrooms, 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture Single beds (2), Double beds (1), Cots (1), Dining seats for 4, Lounge seats for 4
Other Linen provided, Towels provided
Outdoors Balcony or terrace, BBQ
Access Parking
Further details indoors

The twin bedroom can be made into a double on request. If you require two doubles please request this when you book otherwise you will find the villa as described.

Further details outdoors

La Locanda sits on a hillside where it boasts excellent views of the valley below and distant hills dotted with villages and forests. It's location in the Tuscan mountains allows you to sample a part of Tuscany not well known to many travellers, the local produce is just one of the many attractions at La Locanda.

At this property there is something for everyone with activities ranging from just relaxing by the pool, to visiting historical towns, to hiking and canyoning in the nearby natural parks. The owners also live at the property and will be able to help you with all activities, provide you with local products such as jams and cheeses.

Swimming pool - 6 x 12 mtrs, 1.5mtrs deep. Open from May to September

House Maid - available on request

Cook on request

- breakfast and dinner available on request

Washing Machine Onsite - laundry service available on request

Local Leisure - Canyoning, walking trails of varing difficulties (trails are available for all seasons), speleology, trekking, helicopter rides, horse rides and mountain-bike. For further info you can ask the owners.

Approach road - last 100mtrs good unpaved road

Distances - Lucca 48km, Pisa 74km, Florence 126km, Siena 188km, Rome 400km

The villa is entered from the covered furnished terrace that also has a barbeque. From the terrace there are pretty views over the surrounding fields and down to the valley below and distant hills.

Further details

7 Night Villa Price for 2011 - in GBP up to 4 people - NOT per head

The Tuscany region

Lucca is a city and comune in Tuscany, central Italy, situated on the river Serchio in a fertile plain near (but not on) the Ligurian Sea. It is the capital city of the Province of Lucca. Among other reasons, it is famous for its intact Renaissance-era city walls.

Ancient and medieval cityLucca was founded by the Etruscans (there are traces of a pre-existing Ligurian settlement) and became a Roman colony in 180 BC. The rectangular grid of its historical centre preserves the Roman street plan, and the Piazza San Michele occupies the site of the ancient forum. Traces of the amphitheatre can still be seen in the Piazza dell'Anfiteatro. Lucca was the site of a conference in 56 BC which reaffirmed the superiority of the Roman First Triumvirate.

At one point, Lucca was plundered by Odoacer, the first Germanic King of Italy. Lucca was an important city and fortress even in the 6th century, when Narses besieged it for several months in 553. Under the Lombards, it was the seat of a duke who minted his own coins. The Holy Face of Lucca (or Volto Santo), a major relic supposedly carved by Nicodemus, arrived in 742. It became prosperous through the silk trade that began in the 11th century, and came to rival the silks of Byzantium. During the 10-11th centuries Lucca was the capital of the feudal margraviate of Tuscany, more or less independent but owing nominal allegiance to the Holy Roman Emperor.

After the death of Matilda of Tuscany, the city began to constitute itself an independent commune, with a charter in 1160. For almost 500 years, Lucca remained an independent republic. There were many minor provinces in the region between southern Liguria and northern Tuscany dominated by the Malaspina; Tuscany in this time was a part of feudal Europe. Dante’s Divine Comedy includes many references to the great feudal families who had huge jurisdictions with administrative and judicial rights. Dante spent some of his exile in Lucca.

In 1273 and again in 1277 Lucca was ruled by a Guelph capitano del popolo (captain of the people) named Luchetto Gattilusio. In 1314, internal discord allowed Uguccione della Faggiuola of Pisa to make himself lord of Lucca. The Lucchesi expelled him two years later, and handed over the city to another condottiere Castruccio Castracani, under whose rule it became a leading state in central Italy. Lucca rivalled Florence until Castracani's death in 1328. On 22 and 23 September 1325, in the battle of Altopascio, Castracani defeated Florence's Guelphs. For this he was nominated by Louis IV the Bavarian to become duke of Lucca. Castracani's tomb is in the church of San Francesco. His biography is Machiavelli's third famous book on political rule. In 1408, Lucca hosted the convocation intended to end the schism in the papacy. Occupied by the troops of Louis of Bavaria, the city was sold to a rich Genoese, Gherardino Spinola, then seized by John, king of Bohemia. Pawned to the Rossi of Parma, by them it was ceded to Martino della Scala of Verona, sold to the Florentines, surrendered to the Pisans, and then nominally liberated by the emperor Charles IV and governed by his vicar. Lucca managed, at first as a democracy, and after 1628 as an oligarchy, to maintain its independence alongside of Venice and Genoa, and painted the word Libertas on its banner until the French Revolution in 1789.

The walls around the old town remained intact as the city expanded and modernized, unusual for cities in the region. As the walls lost their military importance, they became a pedestrian promenade which encircled the old town, although they were used for a number of years in the 20th century for racing cars. They are still fully intact today; each of the four principal sides is lined with a different tree species.

The Academy of Sciences (1584) is the most famous of several academies and libraries.

The Casa di Puccini is open to the public. At nearby Torre del Lago there is a Puccini opera festival every year in July/August. Puccini had a house there.

Castelnuovo di Garfagnana

There is the village Sillico about 200meters away where there is a small shop. Pieve Fosciana is 7km away and is larger, it has several shops and restaurants.

Castelnuovo di Garfagnana is a bustling town with road and rail links to Lucca, Pisa, Florence and the Versilia coast by Viareggio. National parks of the Apuan Alps and Appenines are an easy drive away and open up a whole host of walks, nature and sports for your enjoyment.

History

The small village of Castelnuovo can be traced back to as early as 740AD but within a century, the village had become an important town with defensive walls and castles. Its location enabled it to establish itself as a transit point for traders and visitors travelling to the northern areas of Italy. Over the centuries, the defensive walls and castles were enlarged and improved. In 1924, Castelnuovo became part of the Province of Lucca.

Today

Even today, the defensive walls play an important role in everyday life in Castelnuovo di Garfagnana. The town walls contain the oldest parts of the town along with winding roads and small artisan shops. The more modern offices, residences, bars, restaurants and train station are outside of the walls.

Principle activities

Many local residents commute to work in Lucca, Pisa or Florence whilst a growing number are able to make a comfortable living from tourism or from the sale of artisan gifts and paintings.

Attractions

The Cathedral of Saint Peter and Saint Paul:

Located within the ancient town walls, the origins of the Cathedral date back to the 10th Century although todays building is based on the 16th Century modernisation. Much restoration was needed following damage sustained during the Second World War, however, the damage actually allowed restorers to see the original classical structure below and enabled them to follow the original buildings lines. Within the Cathedral are many important pieces of Italian art, which include a wooden Crucifix popularly known as ‘the Black Christ’.

Monte Alfonso Fortress:

Built by Duke Alfonso II at the end of the 16th Century, it was designed to offer the residents of the nearby town of Castelnuovo di Garfagnana a safe refuge should the town come under attack or siege.

Whilst much of the fortress has fallen into ruin, a pathway has been developed around the fortress hill so you can walk the route that the defensive walls once took. The walk is approximately 1 hour on a reasonably flat surface and offers outstanding views of Castelnuovo di Garfagnana and the Serchio Valley.

Events

Feast day of St Peter

St Peter is the patron saint of Castelnuovo di Garfagnana and the feast day on 29th June is celebrated by all the locals – many shops may close during the festivities.

Carnival

Castelnuovo di Garfagnana really gets into the spirit of Carnival time during February and you can watch the many floats parade through the town.

September Fair

The September Fair recreates the ancient importance Castelnuovo di Garfagnana held as a trading route between North and South. For 8 days, agricultural fayre is promoted for sale with a favourite being the local Garfagnino cheese. The tourist office has created a few new ideas to accompany the ancient traditions, one of which has proved very popular with the locals – Bingo in the main square!

Market Day

Market Day within the ancient walls of Castelnuovo di Garfagnana is every Thursday. The origins of the Thursday market can be traced back to the 15th Century under the rule of the Este family who passed a law stating that no arrests were allowed to be made on a Thursday in case they interfered with the running of the market. In centuries past, there was even an Army recruitment market stall to ensure the battalions were at their full strength.