Studio | No Bedrooms | sleeps 2

Key Info
  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Nearest beach 6 km
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car not necessary
  • Some pets are welcome - please contact the owner

This studio cottage was created in 2005 from some old piggeries. It's a stylish and efficient use of space that provides a cute and cosy space to enjoy the peace and tranquillity of this special corner of North Cornwall.

The cottage is located at the rear of a stunning 350 year old property called Colan Barton. Set deep within the grounds of this property, they were converted in 2005 from an old workshop and former piggery. You'll be charmed by the stylish conversion of a space that provides all mod cons within this tranquil spot.

Every inch of the unit is fitted to perfection and provides modern kitchen, bathroom, living space and fold away bed – though there is enough space for the bed to remain down all week. There is a TV, DVD, W/Machine, Dishwasher and private patio with table.

You can enjoy breakfast whilst looking out across the lawn and pond of Bos-Lowen and savor this very special corner of the world.

Size Sleeps up to 2, Studio
Nearest beach Porth beach 6 km
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car not necessary
Nearest Amenities 4 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Newquay Airport 10 km, Nearest railway: Truro train station 25 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages
Notes Pets welcome, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Log fire, DVD player
General Central heating, TV, CD player
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Hair dryer
Utilities Clothes dryer, Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 1 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms
Furniture Double beds (1), Dining seats for 2, Lounge seats for 2
Other Linen provided, Towels provided
Outdoors Shared garden, BBQ
Access Parking

The West Country region

The region The region Located in the far west of Great Britain on a peninsula tumbling into the vast Atlantic ocean, almost completely surrounded by the sea, a magnificent coastline wraps around Cornwall for almost 300 miles. Cornwall is also the location of mainland Great Britain's most southerly promontory, The Lizard, and one of the UK's most westerly points, Land's End, while a few miles off shore and even further west is an archipelago of tiny islands that make up the Isles of Scilly.

There are lots of things Cornwall is loved for; the dramatic coastline with its captivating fishing harbours; the spectacular beaches and the pounding surf that provide a natural playground for a variety of water sports; and who can forget famous Cornish pasties and luscious cream teas?

But there are also lots of things about Cornwall that may surprise you. For instance, the wilderness of captivating Bodmin Moor with its panorama of big skies, fascinating prehistoric remains, great walking trails and more than its fair share of local legends.

There's also the dynamic art scene found in mainly in West Cornwall, inspired by the naturally stunning landscape; and more recently a food scene to rival London and beyond; Cornwall now has a multitude of award-winning local food producers and stellar chefs putting the region well and truly on the gourmet map.

Cornwall also has a tremendous history based on its Celtic roots, its Celtic Cornish culture, the warmth and friendliness of the people and the Cornish language that can be seen in the village names.

And that's not all...

Take a trip around Cornwall and you'll discover a hugely diverse landscape. In the far west where the sea turns turquoise in the sun, the sand is white and the natural light is sometimes blindingly bright, the land is adorned with a legacy of Bronze age standing stones, huge granite burial chambers, Celtic crosses and holy wells.

In the old industrial heartland, the landscape, recently awarded World Heritage Site status, is dotted with the fascinating remnants of a triumphant mining past illustrating Cornwall's enormous contribution to the Industrial Revolution with engine houses, museums and miles of recreational trails.

Around the coastline Cornwall's maritime legacy is never far away where local fishermen land their daily catch of fresh seafood and tall ships, luggers and ketches unfurl their sails in the Cornish breeze.

The natural environment, recognised nationally across the twelve sections of the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is accessed by the spectacular South West Coast Path providing walkers with miles of gentle strolls and challenging hikes.

To the north, a sweep of enormous golden sand bays stretches along the coastline often pummelled by giant Atlantic rollers. Long famed for its perfect surfing conditions, the coastline here is a hub for all kinds of extreme sports from coasteering to zapcat racing and scuba diving to rock climbing.

And in the wonderful south of Cornwall, fed by rivers from the high moorlands, leafy estuaries, fishing villages, beaches, harbours and beautiful gardens that flourish in Cornwall's mild climate.

Newquay

Bos-Lowen is set in a stunning little quiet corner of west Cornwall, perfectly positioned to go off and explore the whole county. Your only 15 minutes from the sea, 10 minutes from the nearest National Trust House (Trerice) and your not far from the main artery road the A30, which means you can reach most attractions in no time at all.

Guests return year after year to escape their busy lives and come to relax and soak up the Cornish sun and clean air.