Cottage | 4 bedrooms | sleeps 8

Key Info
  • Beach / lakeside relaxation
  • Nearest beach 0 km
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Car advised
  • No pets allowed
  • Private garden

Breathtaking walks and beaches are at your disposal all year-round at Bay View Cottage It is the perfect base to explore the North Cornwall coast, with day trips to St Ives, Lands End the Eden Project and Padstow all easily achievable.

Situated close to the unspoilt beaches at Polly Joke and Crantock only a few minutes walk from the cottage you will be ideally placed for surf and sand. Walkers will relish the South West coastal path only metres away on National Trust land while golfers will find some excellent courses nearby.

Adjoining the Manor House and set behind the parking-area for the Bowgie Inn, this is a charming semi-detached Grade II Listed cottage with barbeque areas on the front and rear patios. The cottage has a ground floor bedroom,TV room and shower room and is an ideal property for a several generation family seaside holiday.

The cottage also benefits from Wi Fi and a wood burning stove in the dining room

The kitchen/breakfast room is very well equipped and will delight enthusiastic cooks. The adjacent dining room seats 10 people

The rooms at the front have fabulous views across the bay and the interior is equally lovely. The property has been thoughtfully restored retaining many original features with low, narrow passageways, turned staircases, oak floors and hand-painted stencils believed to be over 200 years old in one of the bedrooms.

Size Sleeps up to 8, 4 bedrooms
Nearest beach 300 m
Will consider House swap, Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Newquay 7 km, Nearest railway: Bodmin Parkway 30 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Log fire, DVD player, Sea view
General Central heating, TV, CD player, Wi-Fi available
Standard Kettle, Toaster, Iron, Hair dryer
Utilities Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms of which 1 Family bathrooms, 1 En suites and 1 Shower rooms
Furniture Single beds (4), Double beds (2), Cots (2), Dining seats for 10, Lounge seats for 8
Other High chair
Outdoors Private garden, BBQ
Access Parking
Further details indoors

Electricity. Heating – full oil-fired CH. 2 Travel cots. High chair. Private parking for 2 cars plus additional parking in adjacent car park. Patio furniture and barbecue. WiFi available. Tea, coffee and biscuits available on arrival

Bed linen is provided. It is changed before the start of your holiday and on the Friday during your holiday if your stay extends to more than a week. Access and timing for this should be discussed with the housekeeper. Small hand towels are provided in the bathrooms and drying cloths in the kitchen. ALL OTHER TOWELS MUST BE PROVIDED BY THE GUESTS. There is no linen for cots.

Wi - Fi is available in the cottage

Further details outdoors

Mobile telephone coverage varies depending on the provider but a telephone box is located 25 metres from the front of the cottage.

Further details

Logs for wood-burner - first basket free thereafter purchase locally.

TO RESERVE AND OBTAIN FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT THE OWNER'S WEBSITE by CLICKING ON THE LINK BELOW IN THE CONTACT DETAILS SECTION.

The Cornwall region

Cornwall is a county of England in the United Kingdom, forming the tip of the south-western peninsula of Great Britain. It is bordered to the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar. Taken with the Isles of Scilly Cornwall has a population of 534,300, and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The only city is Truro.

The area now known as Cornwall was first inhabited in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods. It continued to be occupied by Neolithic and then Bronze Age peoples, and later (in the Iron Age) by Celts. There is little evidence that Roman rule was effective west of Exeter and few Roman remains have been found. Cornwall was afterwards part of the Brythonic (Celtic) area of Dumnonia, separated from Wales after the Battle of Deorham, often coming into conflict with the expanding English kingdom of Wessex before King Athelstan in 936 AD set the boundary between English and Cornish people at the Tamar. Today, Cornwall's economy struggles after the decline of the mining and fishing industries, and has become more dependent on tourism. The area is noted for its wild moorland landscapes, its extensive and varied coastline and its mild climate.

Cornwall is recognised as one of the "Celtic nations" by many Cornish people, residents and organisations. It retains a distinct cultural identity, reflecting its history, and modern use of the formerly extinct Cornish language is increasing. Some people question the present constitutional status of Cornwall, and a self-government movement seeks greater autonomy within the UK.

Crantock

Crantock and Porth (Polly) Joke beaches are accessible on foot. Crantock is the next beach along from Fistral Beach. It is a wide sweeping bay with lots of soft sand and a tidal estuary to the River Gannel. There are steep dunes behind the beach and lifeguards are present in high season. Crantock can be accessed on foot from Bay View Cottage via the Coastal Path and there is a short-cut which can be taken at low tide. Please be aware that this short-cut can be steep and slippery.

Polly Joke is a narrow beach, only accessible on foot which means only those in the know tend to visit. There are lots of sheltered nooks and crannies, making this the perfect place to visit on a windier day.

Fistral Beach is a short drive or a long walk away. Renowned for surfing, it's a great place to visit for that laid back Cornish feel. And for those who like to shop, there's some nice surf shops to kit yourself out as well! Wetsuits and boards can be rented year round.

The Newquay town beaches can get very crowded in summer. We recommend both Fistral Bay and Lusty Glaze for their great cafés and exhilarating activities! Watergate Bay is about 15 minutes drive away. This huge expanse of sand is well-known for adrenaline sports including kite-surfing.

Holywell Bay (half an hour's walk) has a lovely sandy beach, nearly a mile long, that takes its name from a holy well said to be located in a cave on the beach, only accessible at low tide. Good for swimming and surfing. If you get bored of sunbathing, a popular walk is from here to Perranporth, 5 miles away.