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Villa | 3 bedrooms | sleeps 8

Key Info
  • Beach or lakeside relaxation
  • Swimming Pool
  • Great for children of all ages
  • Air conditioning
  • No pets allowed
  • Car advised
  • Nearest beach 2km

VILLA “LUX”

Placed just about 3 km from the old town centre of Cefalù, VILLA LUX is a beautiful example of typical Sicilian facility, perfect for a sumptuous and relaxing vacation in a natural scenery.

From here, it is possible to get to different shores, such as Mazzaforno, Baia dei Sette Emiri, Salinelle and Cefalù, enjoying the different landscapes and environments the route displays.

Interiors:

The VILLA is nearly 200 sqm; it offers 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, one living room, one kitchen and a study.

The 3 bedrooms, which overlook the beautiful private garden, are fully equipped with wardrobes, bed tables and table lamps; they can hold 7 people in all.

A large living room with satellite TV and DVD set, sofas and armchairs makes the interiors precious and offers a perfect place for relaxing.

The study offers the possibility to read, write and work peacefully, without “invading” other places in the house, and it is equipped with a divan bed, which allows to take two more people in.

The large kitchen comprises a long dinner table, every useful cooking utensil, a big fridge, dishwasher, toaster, kettle and microwave oven.

The 2 bathrooms are fully equipped with all the sanitary fixtures and shower cubicles.

The entire facility is equipped with free Wi-Fi Internet connection.

VILLA LUX's garden is a true idyllic place, ideal for the kids, comfortable and practical for the adults; the children can safely play with the swing, while their parents can enjoy the relaxing corner of the dinner table, set next to the barbecue.

Exteriors:

Through a little staircase, it is possible to reach the back of the VILLA and, there, the just built swimming pool with hydromassage and different solarium zones immersed in olive trees and in the luxuriant Mediterranean vegetation.

The original house's roof has been transformed into a panoramic terrace (150 sqm), decorated with beautiful Sicilian potteries, offering a wonderful sight over the sea and the entire bay of Mazzaforno; the wooden gazebo, equipped with deckchairs and small tables, is the perfect place for a cocktail at sunset – a moment to be immortalized and kept forever.

Private car park comprised.

Size Sleeps up to 8, 3 bedrooms
Nearest beach Mazzaforno 2 km
Will consider Long term lets (over 1 month), Short breaks (1-4 days)
Access Car advised
Nearest Amenities 3 km
Nearest travel links Nearest airport: Palermo 85 km, Nearest railway: Cefalù 4 km
Family friendly Great for children of all ages, Suitable for people with restricted mobility
Notes No pets allowed, No smoking at this property

Features and Facilities

Luxuries Internet access, DVD player, Sea view
General Air conditioning, TV, CD player, Pool or snooker table, Safe, Satellite TV, Wi-Fi available
Standard Toaster, Iron
Utilities Clothes dryer, Dishwasher, Cooker, Microwave, Fridge, Freezer, Washing machine
Rooms 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms of which 2 Family bathrooms, Solarium or roof terrace
Furniture Single beds (1), Double beds (3)
Other Linen provided, Towels provided, High chair
Outdoors Balcony or terrace, Shared garden, BBQ
Access Parking

The Sicily region

Sicily is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea; along with surrounding minor islands, it constitutes an autonomous region of Italy, the Regione Autonoma Siciliana

This centre mediterranean region extends from the tip of the Apennine peninsula from which it is separated only by narrow Strait of Messina, towards the North African coast.

Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, which is at 3,320 m (10,890 ft) the tallest active volcano in Europe and one of the most active in the world. The island has a typical Mediterranean climate.

Sicilia has a rich and unique culture, especially with regard to the arts, music, literature, cuisine, architecture and language.

Sicily also holds importance for archeological and ancient sites such as the Necropolis of Pantalica, the Valley of the Temples and Selinunte.

Cefalu

Cefalù (Sicilian: Cifalù, Greek: Diod, Strabo, or , Ptol.; Latin: Cephaloedium, or Cephaloedis, Pliny) is a city and comune in the province of Palermo, located on the northern coast of Sicily, Italy on the Tyrrhenian Sea about 70 km east from the provincial capital and 185 km west of Messina.

The town is one of the major tourist attractions in the region. Despite its size, every year it attracts millions of tourists from all parts of Sicily and also, from all over Italy and Europe. In summer the population can triple, making the main streets and major roads in the country crowded, and with it a young atmosphere and lively nightlife. The villages, a unique combination of small Italian towns that stand out among others for artistic, cultural and historic reasons, and for harmony of urban liveability and public services.[1]

The Cathedral

Main article: Cathedral of Cefalù

The Cathedral, begun in 1131, in a style of Norman architecture which would be more accurately called Sicilian Romanesque. The exterior is well preserved, and is largely decorated with interlacing pointed arches; the windows also are pointed. On each side of the façade is a massive tower of four storeys. The round-headed Norman portal is worthy of note. A semi-circular apse is set into the east end wall. Its strengthening counterforts that work like buttresses, are shaped as paired columns to lighten their aspect. The groined vaulting of the roof is visible in the choir and the right transept, while the rest of the church has a wooden roof. Fine cloisters, coeval with the cathedral, adjoin it.

Two strong matching towers flank the cathedral porch, which has three arches (rebuilt around 1400) corresponding to the nave and the two aisles.

Christus Pantokrator in the apsis of the cathedral

Church of St. Stefano.

The interior of the cathedral was restored in 1559, though the pointed arches of the nave, borne by ancient granite columns, are still visible: and the only mosaics preserved are those of the apse and the last bay of the choir: they are remarkably fine specimens of the Byzantine art of the period (1148) and, though restored in 1859-1862, have suffered much less than those at Palermo and Monreale from the process. The figure of the Pantocrator gracing the apse is especially noteworthy.

[edit] Other churches

Santa Maria dell'Odigitria, popularly referred to simply as Itria, its name the rendition in Italian of the Greek Hodegetria, one of the standard iconographic depictions of the Virgin Mary. Probably built over a preexisting Byzantine church of the same name, the current building is from the 16th century. Until 1961 it consisted of two different religious edifices, the second being a chapel devoted to St. Michael Archangel; both were a property of the Confraternity of St. Mary of the Odigitria.

Santa Oliva (1787). It has a tuff portal.

San Sebastiano (probably 1523). It has a single nave with two frescoed niches on every side.

Sant'Andrea.

San Leonardo, mentioned from 1159 and, until the restoration of 1558, entitled to St. George. The original portal, now closed behind a wall, has vegetable decorations similar to the Cathedral's ones.

The Immacolatella (1661).

The Oratory of the Santissimo Sacramento (1688).

Chapel of San Biagio (St. Blaise).

Santo Stefano or Church of Purgatory.

Santissima Trinità.

Santissima Annunziata (c. 1511). The façade has a large rose window and a relief with the Annunciation.

The Monastery of St. Catherine.

[edit] Others

Some remains of the ancient city are still visible, on the summit of the rock; but the nature of the site proves that it could never have been more than a small town, and probably owed its importance only to its almost impregnable position. Fazello speaks of the remains of the walls as still existing in his time, as well as those of a temple of Doric architecture, of which the foundations only are now visible. But the most curious monument still remaining of the ancient city is an edifice, consisting of various apartments, and having the appearance of a palace or domestic residence, but constructed wholly of large irregular blocks of limestone, in the style commonly called polygonal or Cyclopean. Rude mouldings approximating to those of the Doric order, are hewn on the face of the massive blocks. The doorways are of finely-cut stone, and of Greek type, and the date, though uncertain, cannot, from the careful jointing of the blocks, be very early. This building, which is almost unique of its kind, is the more remarkable, from its being the only example of this style of masonry, so common in Central Italy, which occurs in the island of Sicily. It is fully described and figured by Dr. Nott in the Annali dell'Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica, for the year 1831 (vol. iii. p. 270-87).

On the summit of the promontory are extensive remains of a Saracenic castle. The town's fortifications formerly extended to the shore, on the side where the modern town now is, in the form of two long walls protecting the port. There are remains of a wall of massive rectangular blocks of stone at the modern Porta Garibaldi on the south.

Other sights include:

The Seminary and the Bishops Palace.

Palazzo Atenasio Martino (15th century). The court has 16th century frescoes.

Palazzo Maria (13th century). The medieval portal and a mullioned window, with Catalan-style vegetable decorations, are still visible.

Palazzo Piraino (16th century).

Osterio Magno. According to the tradition, it was built by Roger II as his mansion, but it probably dates from the

14th century. Traces of the medieval tower and decoration can be seen. Excavations held in the interior have showed the presence of ancient edifices and ceramics.

Ancient Roman baths.

The remains of the Abbey of Thelema,[8] established by the occultist Aleister Crowley in 1920 as a magical commune before he was ordered to leave by the Benito Mussolini government in 1923. The abbey is now in a state of severe disrepair.

Not far from the town is the sanctuary of Gibilmanna.

Guest reviewsPowered by TripAdvisor

Guest reviews Powered by TripAdvisor

Review 1-1 of 1

9 May 2013

4/5

"We had a perfect holiday in Cefalu in Villa Lux"

Cefalu is a very nice small village to spend yout holliday. Villa Lux is a good place to stay. It is a big house with four bedrooms and two badrooms. The pool you have to share with the neighbours, but is very nice ans save for children. The house has a cosy garden and a nice terrace to eat outside. It has a big kitchen to cook your iwn meal. The closest beach is a few minutes drive from the house. You could walk but it is not an easy route. Cefalu is 5 to 10 minutes drive from villa lux and has a very nice beach. There are plenty restaurants, basr and shops. And we really reccoment to climb "La Rocca".
The owner of Villa Lux is friendly and helpfull. No difficult discussions about a deposit or cleaning costs. The price is really everything included.

Review 1-1 of 1

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Francesco S.

  • 2 Years listed

40% Response rate

Based in Italy

Languages spoken
  • English
  • French
  • Italian
  • Dutch

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